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I have three tables. Employees, Projects (Many-To-Many) and EmployeesProject.

I want to retrieve the name of each employee and their respective projects.

I was trying to use this query:

SELECT Employee.name, Project.name 
FROM Employee, Project
INNER JOIN EmployeeProject ON Employee.empNo = EmployeeProject.empNo
INNER JOIN EmployeeProject ON Project.projectNo = EmployeeProject.projectNo;

Access was giving me a syntax error. Then I've tried this query and it worked:

SELECT Employee.name, Project.name 
FROM Employee, Project, EmployeeProject
WHERE Employee.empNo = EmployeeProject.empNo AND EmployeeProject.projectNo = Project.projectNo;

My question is; is that ok to use WHERE to link tables or there is a better way to do it, like INNER...

Regards

share|improve this question
    
You must put "(" and ")" to your INNER JOINs if you are using MS ACCESS. It requires that. also use inner join in employee and project. –  Sid Nov 14 '12 at 2:17
    
In case you are interested: a general comparison of INNER JOIN vs WHERE has been asked before. –  madth3 Nov 14 '12 at 2:18
    
Not according to this documentation which shows examples of joins not () enclosed. –  Michael Berkowski Nov 14 '12 at 2:19
    
It does not need AND –  Camus Nov 14 '12 at 2:20
    
Ok then. Just stating from my experience in googling for that syntax before. –  Sid Nov 14 '12 at 2:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

When using explicit JOINs, you do not comma-separate tables in the FROM clause. The correct syntax for an explicit JOIN (preferred over the older implicit syntax using the WHERE clause) is:

SELECT
  /* Probably will need to give these aliases since the're both called name */
  Employee.name AS empname,
  Project.name AS projname 
FROM 
  Employee
  /* Employee joins through EmployeeProject */
  INNER JOIN EmployeeProject ON Employee.empNo = EmployeeProject.empNo
  /* ...into Project */
  INNER JOIN Project ON Project.projectNo = EmployeeProject.projectNo;

If Access is complaining, it may require () around the join clauses (though I cannot find documentation which specifies it)

FROM 
  (Employee
  INNER JOIN EmployeeProject ON Employee.empNo = EmployeeProject.empNo)
  INNER JOIN Project ON Project.projectNo = EmployeeProject.projectNo;
share|improve this answer
    
It is still giving me an error. It says syntax error (missing operator) –  Camus Nov 14 '12 at 2:20
    
Try () around the first join pair –  Michael Berkowski Nov 14 '12 at 2:25
    
thats what I have stated. I cannot find any documentation regarding it but access requires it. :) –  Sid Nov 14 '12 at 2:31
    
Now it is working. Thanks. Only one more question related. The result that I get shows all the employees and their related projects, good but if I want to show all the employees regardless if they are in a project. Thanks –  Camus Nov 14 '12 at 2:40
    
Change to a LEFT JOIN between Employee and EmployeeProject. –  Michael Berkowski Nov 14 '12 at 3:37
  1. Brackets ARE required, even in Access 2010, when you have more than 2 tables involved.
  2. The order of tables in the JOIN is important. You cannot jump from Employee -> Project (unrelated) through to EmployeeProject (joining on both)

This works

SELECT Employee.name, Project.name 
FROM ((Employee
INNER JOIN EmployeeProject ON Employee.empNo = EmployeeProject.empNo)
INNER JOIN Project ON EmployeeProject.projectNo = Project.projectNo);

Note: You can drop the outer bracket between FROM and the final ;, but safer practice to always include it.

You can nest joins - and preserve the ordering of the tables (Employee, Project, EmployeeProject) if you nest them like this:

SELECT Employee.name, Project.name 
FROM Employee
INNER JOIN (Project 
            INNER JOIN EmployeeProject 
              ON EmployeeProject.projectNo = Project.projectNo)
  ON Employee.empNo = EmployeeProject.empNo;


Using the explicit JOIN syntax is much more flexible, because you can now show employees even if they don't have any projects on - just by changing to LEFT joins.

SELECT Employee.name, Project.name 
FROM ((Employee
LEFT JOIN EmployeeProject ON Employee.empNo = EmployeeProject.empNo)
LEFT JOIN Project ON EmployeeProject.projectNo = Project.projectNo);

Note: In datasheet view and in forms, the columns produced are named "Employee.name" and "Project.name", so you don't explicitly have to alias them, although it could be useful.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 And hopefully the columns (fields) are not called by reserved words such as Name. –  Fionnuala Nov 14 '12 at 9:15

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