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Short version:

How can I map two columns from table A and B if they both have a common identifier which in turn may have two values in column C

Lets say:

A
---
 1 , 2 

B
--- 
 ? , 3 


C 
----- 
45, 2
45, 3

Using table C I know that id 2 and 3 belong to the same item ( 45 ) and thus "?" in table B should be 1.

What query could do something like that?

EDIT

Long version ommited. It was really boring/confusing

EDIT

I'm posting some output here.

From this query:

select distinct( rolein) , activityin from taskperformance@dm_prod where activityin in ( 
    select activityin from activities@dm_prod where activityid in ( 
        select activityid from activities@dm_prod where activityin in ( 
            select distinct( activityin  ) from taskperformance where rolein = 0 
        )
    )
)

I have the following parts:

select distinct( activityin  ) from taskperformance where rolein = 0

Output:

http://question1337216.pastebin.com/f5039557

    select activityin from activities@dm_prod where activityid in ( 
        select activityid from activities@dm_prod where activityin in ( 
            select distinct( activityin  ) from taskperformance where rolein = 0 
        )
    )

Output:

http://question1337216.pastebin.com/f6cef9393

And finally:

select distinct( rolein) , activityin from taskperformance@dm_prod where activityin in ( 
    select activityin from activities@dm_prod where activityid in ( 
        select activityid from activities@dm_prod where activityin in ( 
            select distinct( activityin  ) from taskperformance where rolein = 0 
        )
    )
)

Output:

http://question1337216.pastebin.com/f346057bd

Take for instace activityin 335 from first query ( from taskperformance B) .

It is present in actvities from A.

But is not in taskperformace in A ( but a the related activities: 92, 208, 335, 595 )

Are present in the result. The corresponding role in is: 1

share|improve this question
    
Do you need to run this update just one time, or repeatedly throughout the life of the project? –  JYelton Aug 26 '09 at 20:41
    
No, just one time ever. For some previous problems I have even print the output to a file and then search and replace stuff. Like select columnA from table and then copy/past in a file and search and replace s/number/insert into table $1 where value = $2 etc... –  OscarRyz Aug 26 '09 at 20:48
    
But at this point my head hurts so much I cannot think on "creative" alternatives. –  OscarRyz Aug 26 '09 at 20:49

2 Answers 2

It seems like for any given activityin, the same rolein value applies. Thus if database A (db1) has at least one association for each for the rolein/activityin relationships, you can populate database B (db2) with a simple one-time update query:

UPDATE db2.taskperformance
SET db2.taskperformance.rolein =
(SELECT db1.taskperformance.rolein
FROM db1.taskperformance
WHERE db1.taskperformance.activityin = db2.taskperformance.activityin);

I strongly advise backing up the database first before running the query as it will change all the rolein values, and if my assumption is incorrect, you may have bad data.

EDIT

Although I think it could be done in one query, it's beyond my knowledge of sql. However I think the following will work: Create a temporary table that contains all the rolein values for each activityin value in database A. This table essentially becomes an activities table, except now you have numbers replacing the activityid values, which can be looked up to fill in the missing values of rolein for database B.

CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE db2.ttable
SELECT db1.taskperformance.rolein, db1.activities.activityin
FROM db1.taskperformance, db1.activities
WHERE db1.taskperformance.activityin = db1.activities.activityin;

From the original data, this yields:

rolein     activityin 
1          1          
1          2          
2          3          
2          4          
3          6          
3          7          
3          7

Now you should be able to run the update query against this temporary table:

UPDATE db2.taskperformance
SET db2.taskperformance.rolein =
(SELECT db2.ttable.rolein
FROM db2.ttable
WHERE db2.taskperformance.activityin = db2.ttable.activityin);

The problem with this will be if you have unique values in database B for activityin that do not occur in database A.

Finally:

DROP TEMPORARY TABLE db2.ttable;

For completeness' sake.

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed, actually I've got it updated like that for all the records whose activityin matched in both tables stackoverflow.com/questions/1331294/… . The problem now is when they do not match directly in taskperformace ( they don't have same activtiyin ) but they do match in the activities. ( like 1,1 in db1 and ?,2 in db2 and activties have ( {"start",1 } {"start",2} ) :( :( :( –  OscarRyz Aug 26 '09 at 20:57
    
Which activities table would have the correct associations for the data in database B? Or to elaborate: is the activities table identical in both databases? –  JYelton Aug 26 '09 at 21:20
    
no, that's the problem. They do have identical "labels" but different id ( for 75% of the cases... ) no.. about 90% they are identical. The missing 10% is the one that cause me in first place to have the rolein empty in the first migration attempt. :( –  OscarRyz Aug 26 '09 at 21:33
    
BTW +1 for the support :P ( let me warn you'll become addicted ) –  OscarRyz Aug 26 '09 at 21:34
    
Thank you. It is a semi-complicated issue but I think it can be readily solved. So my next (and hopefully final) question is: Can the activities table in database A can be used to populate all of the rolein values of taskperformance in database B (ignoring the activities table of database B)? –  JYelton Aug 26 '09 at 21:53
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Finally I've got it.

It seems that I just didn't develop the section of the brain that helps to make queries.

Here's the result

select distinct(  a.rolein ) , a.activityin, b.activityin 
from 
    taskperformance@dm_prod a,
    taskperformance b, 
    activities@dm_prod c,
    activities d
where b.rolein = 0
    and b.activityin = d.activityin 
    and d.activityid = c.activityid
    and c.activityin = a.activityin
order by b.activityin , a.activityin

Thank you JYelton, your questions helped me to understand my own question better.

share|improve this answer
    
Glad I was able to help, I am not sure my final suggestion would give in the same results as what you came up with, but it was a good mind bender. Good luck. –  JYelton Aug 27 '09 at 7:58

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