Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a variable conts which contains the contents of a binary file (read it with rb as mode). Now when I try to get pieces of the string via slicing I would expect to see the proper length for the variables (and obviously the contents, too), but I don't.

Here is code with which I can reproduce this and I am out of ideas what is going on here:

hdr1, hdr2 = conts[0:6], conts[10:7]
print "----------------"
print len(conts)
print len(hdr1)
print len(hdr2)
print len(conts)
print "----------------"
print type(hdr1)
print type(hdr2)
print type(conts)

The output I get is however:

----------------
32174321
6
0
32174321
----------------
<type 'str'>
<type 'str'>
<type 'str'>

What's going on here? I thought slicing would create a new string for each slice?

Python version: 2.7.2 (default, Jun 12 2011, 15:08:59) [MSC v.1500 32 bit (Intel)]

Note: the four-byte gap between the slices is intentional. The problem is rather that the second slice returns a zero-length string, even though there would be enough data. I found no documentation that pieces (when slicing) need to be adjacent.

Edit: after realizing my error: I intended to get from a string longer than 17 bytes the bytes 0 to 6 and the bytes 10 to 17.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The reason this is an empty string is because you didn't mention that you wanted a negitive step for the slicing, assuming you did mean to slice backwards.

hdr1, hdr2 = conts[0:6], conts[10:7:-1]

Will do what you want, notice the -1 that lets python know that you want to step backwards when slicing instead of forwards.

As an aside, this also leads to an easy way to reverse strings:

reverse = string[::-1]

The format of slicing is:

[start_index:end_index:step]


From your edit I can see that this answer may be redundant for your purpose, but it is good information for you to know so I will leave it up.
Here is how you would do what you said in your edit:

hdr1, hdr2 = conts[0:6], conts[10:17]
share|improve this answer

Maybe not

hdr1, hdr2 = conts[0:6], conts[10:7]

But:

hdr1, hdr2 = conts[0:6], conts[7:10]

I mean should first > second index in a slice except negative step(third param) specified?

So as per your edit:

hdr1, hdr2 = conts[0:6], conts[10:17]
share|improve this answer
    
Yep, my bad. I actually got confused (too much jumping between programming languages, I guess) *blush* –  0xC0000022L Nov 14 '12 at 3:51
    
@0xC0000022L sometimes this happens))) –  Artsiom Rudzenka Nov 14 '12 at 3:52

conts[10:7] you probably mean conts[7:10]

share|improve this answer
    
Right, second parameter is end index not length. -> head on keyboard. Thanks *blush* –  0xC0000022L Nov 14 '12 at 3:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.