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I have numeric vectors, such as c(1, 2, 3, 3, 2, 1, 3) or c(1, 4, 1, 4, 4, 1), and I would like to keep individual element's position, but swap/reverse the value, so that we get c(3, 2, 1, 1, 2, 3, 1), c(4, 1, 4, 1, 1, 4) respectively.

To achieve that, I came up with a rather rough and ugly code below with lots of debugging and patching...

blah <- c(1, 4, 1, 4, 4, 1, 3)
blah.uniq <- sort(unique(blah))
blah.uniq.len <- length(blah.uniq)
j <- 1
end <- ceiling(blah.uniq.len / 2)
if(end == 1) {end <- 2} # special case like c(1,4,1), should get c(4,1,4) 
for(i in blah.uniq.len:end) {
  x <- blah == blah.uniq[i]
  y <- blah == blah.uniq[j]
  blah[x] <- blah.uniq[j]
  blah[y] <- blah.uniq[i]
  j = j + 1
}
blah

Is there an easier way to do this?

share|improve this question
    
While the example in your question is very straightforward, I feel that I should mention possibilities that could cause problems for generalizing the below methods of reverse scoring. First, if one's data does not contain the full possible range of scores (e.g., if '5' was a possible score in either of your examples), there will be a problem with the factor method. Second, if the scores do not start at 1 (e.g., if they start at 0) there is a problem with the second answer. –  jflournoy Nov 24 '13 at 20:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Congratulations! You might have finally found a use for factors , I was still looking for one :-)

x <- c(1, 2, 3, 3, 2, 1, 3)
# [1] 1 2 3 3 2 1 3
y <- factor(x)
# [1] 1 2 3 3 2 1 3
# Levels: 1 2 3
levels(y) <- rev(levels(y))
# [1] 3 2 1 1 2 3 1
# Levels: 3 2 1

Built on that idea, here is a function that returns an object with the same class as the input:

swap <- function(x) {
    f <- factor(x)
    y <- rev(levels(f))[f]
    class(y) <- class(x)
    return(y)
}
swap(c(1, 2, 3, 3, 2, 1, 3))
# [1] 3 2 1 1 2 3 1
swap(c(1, 4, 1, 4, 4, 1))
# [1] 4 1 4 1 1 4
share|improve this answer
    
flodel, I was actually reading on factor (stat.berkeley.edu/classes/s133/factors.html). Your solution is quite elegant. Since I am new to the idea of factor, what is the best way to wrap my mind around the syntax levels(foo)[foo]? I ran the code in R, but the syntax levels(f)[f] is a little counter-intuitive to me. It is like choosing range f from the levels of f. Is that right? I am merely trying to learn and understand the syntax. Thanks. –  Antony Nov 15 '12 at 18:21
    
Imagine you have a long vector with only a few distinct values. For example, a vector of length 10,000,000 where each item can take two values: "abcdef..." or "123456...." (imagine these are very long strings). If R stored it as-is, it would take a lot of space, no? That's where factors come handy. Instead of storing a big vector of characters, R just stores 1) a short vector of unique values, the levels: c("abcdef...", "123456....") and 2) a long vector of 1 and 2. These two vectors will use a lot less space. –  flodel Nov 15 '12 at 22:01
    
Now, how do you get back the original vector of strings? You just need to index the levels, i.e., c("abcdef...", "123456...."), by the long vector of indices, i.e., the vector of 1 and 2. I hope it helped. –  flodel Nov 15 '12 at 22:02

I think you're trying to reverse score. The algorithm is (1 + max(x_i)) - x_i

so...

x <- c(1, 2, 3, 3, 2, 1, 3)
y <- c(1, 4, 1, 4, 4, 1)

(max(x, na.rm=T) + 1) - x
(max(y, na.rm=T) + 1) - y

yielding:

> (max(x, na.rm=T) + 1) - x
[1] 3 2 1 1 2 3 1
> (max(y, na.rm=T) + 1) - y
[1] 4 1 4 1 1 4

Per the OP's comment:

rev.score <- function(x) {
    h <- unique(x)
    a <- seq(min(h, na.rm=T), max(h, na.rm=T))
    b <- rev(a)
    dat <- data.frame(a, b)
    dat[match(x, dat[, 'a']), 2]
}

x <- c(1, 2, 3, 3, 2, 1, 3)
rev.score(x)
y <- c(1, 4, 1, 4, 4, 1)
rev.score(y)
z <- c(1, 5, 10, -3, -5, 2)
rev.score(z)
share|improve this answer
    
PS I believe there are packages to do this to but it's simple to do yourself. You could make it into a function as well: rev.score <- function(x) (max(x) + 1) - x –  Tyler Rinker Nov 14 '12 at 4:18
    
+1 for deciphering an opaque question –  mnel Nov 14 '12 at 4:19
    
Thanks it took me a bit to figure out what the poster was after. –  Tyler Rinker Nov 14 '12 at 4:20
    
Actually, the algorithm assumes that individual element has to be > 0. Are there even better ones that work all real numbers (including negative numbers and zero)? –  Antony Nov 14 '12 at 5:05
3  
Actually, the algorithm is a classic in psychometrics that is simple and fit your ambiguous post. Occam's razor says simplest tool for the job. If you have corner cases please try to think about them and indicate it in your question or in the example code you give. Actually is a loaded word that is a smack in the face of someone trying to provide help. Please see my edit above. –  Tyler Rinker Nov 14 '12 at 5:44

A possible generalisable function.

revscore <- function(x) {
  rx <- min(x):max(x)
  rev(rx)[sapply(1:length(x), function(y) match(x[y],rx))]
}

x1 <- c(-3,-1,0,-2,3,2,1)
x2 <- c(-1,0,1,2)
x3 <- 1:7

Some testing:

> x1
[1] -3 -1  0 -2  3  2  1
> revscore(x1)
[1]  3  1  0  2 -3 -2 -1

> x2
[1] -1  0  1  2
> revscore(x2)
[1]  2  1  0 -1

> x3
[1] 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
> revscore(x3)
[1] 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
share|improve this answer
    
I'm curious but too lazy to check which is faster in benchmarking as mine takes the time to build a data frame but yours uses sapply. Just a curiosity. +1 –  Tyler Rinker Nov 14 '12 at 6:27

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