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My entities are marked with

@Cache(usage = CacheConcurrencyStrategy.TRANSACTIONAL)

and the application runs (not sure how to verify entities are actually cached).

Hibernate config within spring context:

<prop key="hibernate.cache.use_second_level_cache">true</prop>
<prop key="hibernate.cache.region.factory_class">org.hibernate.cache.ehcache.EhCacheRegionFactory</prop>

Now if a change the cache from ehcache to infinispan I get an exception stating that this is a transactional cache but no transaction manager was found.

Therefore my question: Is the ehcache actually transactional?

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2 Answers 2

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As of release 2.1 Ehcache has support for transactional caches... But you do realize that (any) transactional cache with Hibernate requires a full blown JTA environment ?

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Ok, so the fact that ehcache runs with transactional cache strategy and NO JTA (in contrast to infinispan that throws an exception) coul dbe considered a bug? I mean if a say "run transactional" and it does not without warning...not ideal. –  beginner_ Nov 23 '12 at 6:54
    
Sounds not correct indeed... I'd create a jira with that info at jira.terracotta.org/jira/browse/EHC with exact versions of both Hibernate & Ehcache you are running. –  Alex Snaps Nov 26 '12 at 17:23

As per my knowledge, EH Cache is not transactional. See below link by hibernate itself. It also says EH Cache is non-transactional. JBoss Cache is transaction that I know.

http://docs.jboss.org/hibernate/orm/3.3/reference/en/html/performance.html#performance-cache

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Ehcache has transactional support for Hibernate. Also, I think JBoss Cache is "deprecated" and people are pointed to Infinispan now –  Alex Snaps Nov 22 '12 at 18:21

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