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Fr the following generic class, there is a compilation error for the line r=g: Type mismatch: cannot convert from GenericTest1<Integer> to GenericTest1<Number> How can it be fixed?

public class GenericTest1<T> {
    private T t;

    public GenericTest1(T t) {
        this.t = t;
    }

    public void set(T t) {
        this.t = t;
    }

    public T get() {
        return t;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        GenericTest1<Integer> g = new GenericTest1<>(6);
        GenericTest1<Number> r = g; <==here
    }
}
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2  
Typecast it GenericTest1<Number> r =(GenericTest1<Integer>) g; –  Shashank Kadne Nov 14 '12 at 6:37
1  
@ShashankKadne the type cast won't work - it still does not compile. –  David Tanzer Nov 14 '12 at 6:41
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5 Answers

The misconception here is that GenericTest1<Number> is a superclass of GenericTest1<Integer>. It isn't, so you have to cast each member individually.

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It is a common misunderstanding when it comes to programming with generics. Here two concrete type GenericTest1<Integer> and GenericTest1<Number> has no relationship. The only common part is both are subclass of Object.

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The tow classes, GenericTest<Number> and GenericTest<Integer> are not assignment compatible. You can not even cast them. But, if you don't mind copying the object, you can do the following:

Add a copy constructor to your class:

public GenericTest1(GenericTest1<? extends T> other) {
    this.t = other.t;
}

And then copy the object:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    GenericTest1<Integer> g = new GenericTest1<>(6);
    GenericTest1<Number> r = new GenericTest1<Number>(g);
}
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GenericTest1<Integer> and GenericTest1<Number> are not compatible and you cannot cast between them! But if you don't want to expose Integer, you can use a bound:

GenericTest1<? extends Number> r = g;

r is a GenericTest1<Integer> in real, but the declaration allows access to Number only. Because of the unspecific type T, you cannot call set() (ok, works with null), but you can use get():

g.set(Integer.valueOf(1)); // OK
r.set(Integer.valueOf(1)); // compile ERROR
if (r.get().intValue() == 1) { //OK
    ...  
}
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By doing so, I get the compilation error: Type mismatch: cannot convert from GenericTest1<Integer> to GenericTest1<? extends Number> –  J Any Nov 14 '12 at 17:23
    
Which Java Version do you use? No problem with Java 6 or 7. I have no Java 5 any more. –  Arne Burmeister Nov 14 '12 at 20:42
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First of all, I would limit acceptable types in your class and introduce method that compares the field with Number or with other GenericNumber and define your generic class like

public class GenericNumber<T extends Number> {
    private T number;
    public T getNumber() {
        return number;
    }
    public void setNumber(T number) {
        this.number = number;
    }
    public void setNumber(T number) {
        this.number = number;
    }
    //constructors
    public int compareTo(Number n) throws Exception {
        if((number == null) || (n == null))
            throw new Exception("Can't compare null values");
        else if(number.doubleValue() > n.doubleValue)
            return 1;
        else if(number.doubleValue() == n.doubleValue)
            return 0;
        else
            return 1;
    }
    public int compareTo(GenericNumber n) throws Exception {
        if(n == null)
            throw new Exception("Can't compare null values");
        return compateTo(n.getNumber());
    }
}

With this approach testing for equality of instances will transform into the following condition, with your objects: (r.compareTo(g) == 0).

If you don't want to use the java-flavoured comparing class method of this type you can, of course, typecast the fields and compare with = operator.

For the behaviour you expect it is not right to make such an assignment because GenericNumber<Integer> is not a subtype of GenericNumber<Number>, as our intuition implies, though Integer is subtype of Number. To understand that suppose that in your case you would like to call a set method on an instance of GenericNumber<Number>:

GenericNumber<Integer> i = new GenericNumber<Integer>();
Integer ii = 3;
i.setNumber(ii);
GenericNumber<Number> n = i;//suppose it will be consumed by compiler
//in this case it will be tempting to forget about i and use n instead, like in the following lines
Folat f = 2.5f;
n.setNumber(f);
//would be valid because method signature will be 
//public void Number setNumber(Number number)
//but what actually happens is that you will try to call method of class
//GenericNumber<Integer> with signature public void Integer setNumber(Integer number)

As you see, the last line will cause an error, so you need to use generics with caution.

By the way, tutorial section on generics of then-Sun, now-Oracle site is worth visiting, namely: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/generics/index.html and/or http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/extra/generics/index.html.

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