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OK so I have read a lot of the post that suggest how to eliminate that extra space, but for whatever reason it seems I can't apply those suggestions to my system, so I am here asking for your help.

These are the last few lines of my code:

    for line in rline[start+5 : end] :
        words = line.split()
        word1 = int(words[1])
        print >>opennew, "%s%s" % (word1,line[30:])

And the new "opennew" file looks like this :

    1        0.876153    0.152889   -0.047464

    2        1.011880   -1.161641   -2.096289

    3        0.883419    1.558736    1.966913

    4        2.010367   -1.140725    1.053368

While what I really want is:

    1        0.876153    0.152889   -0.047464
    2        1.011880   -1.161641   -2.096289
    3        0.883419    1.558736    1.966913
    4        2.010367   -1.140725    1.053368

Is there anyway I add to the code something to remove that additional (unwanted) enter/space from my input?

Thanks a lot for the help.

PS: (Please do not ask why I split the lines in the code, there is a purpose for this will have an application in a future (better) code)

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4 Answers 4

Thanks all of you for the suggestions, based on ThiefMaster answer it occur to me that I could just eliminate the last white space from the line by adding a "-1", instead of eliminating the Python own linebreak, with this the problem was fixed

    print >>opennew, "%s%s" % (word1,line[30:-1])

Another way I tried before was

    opennew.write (str(word1) + (line[30:]) + "")

The additional quotes at the end are the ones that eliminate that additional (unwanted) enter/space. It worked for me, but honestly I do not know why, do you know what those additional quotes do?

Thanks

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Try stripping the newlines off of line:

line = line.rstrip("\n")
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1  
You don't need to do anything different on Windows. –  martineau Nov 14 '12 at 10:24
    
@martineau Really? I thought you would need to remove a carriage return as well for Windows files. I could be wrong, as I have no way of testing it. –  squiguy Nov 14 '12 at 15:58
1  
If data is read or written from/to a file in non-binary text mode, the default open() mode, conversion from/to the platform's line-ending convention is currently handled for you automatically in Python. –  martineau Nov 14 '12 at 17:06

As @ThiefMaster or @squiguy suggested, but another way is:

import sys
sys.stdout.write('%s%s' % (word1, line[30:]))

Although I'd probably go for .rstrip

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Thanks all of you for the suggestions, based on ThiefMaster answer it occur to me that I could just eliminate the last white space from the line by adding a "-1", instead of eliminating the Python own linebreak, with this the problem was fixed print >>opennew, "%s%s" % (word1,line[30:-1]) –  henry martinez Nov 15 '12 at 0:20

You can either remove the trailing whitespace from each line using line = line.rstrip() or change the print statement to omit its own trailing linebreak:

print >>opennew, "%s%s" % (word1,line[30:]),
#                                          ^

However, due to the convoluted syntax of the print statement it is probably better to use rstrip()...

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I do like print whatever, but agree it's sometimes too subtle (or just removed because it's not understood and presumed wrong). Only slight point is the OP may want .rstrip('\n') if for some reason trailing whitespace is significant –  Jon Clements Nov 14 '12 at 7:47
    
He's dumping a human-readable table in plaintext to stdout. So trailing whitespace is most likely not significant and usually also not wanted e.g. in case of redirecting the data to a file. –  ThiefMaster Nov 14 '12 at 7:50

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