Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing a program that plays War the card game. Each player has a set of cards, and I've gotten it to deal randomly fine. I need it to be able to compare two values in the list and do something depending on their integer values. I've written the code as follows:

from random import *
def main():
    cards = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12]*4
    p1 = []
    p2 = []
    while len(cards) != 0:
        m = randint(0,len(cards))
        p1.append(cards[m-1])
        del cards[m-1]
        n = randint(0,len(cards))
        p2.append(cards[n-1])
        del cards[n-1]
    print(p1, p2)
    def game():
        if p1[0] > p2[0]:
            p1.append(p2[0])
            del p2[0]
        elif p2[0] > p1[0]:
            p2.append(p1[0])
            del p1[0]
        else:
            if len(p1) > len(p2):
                print(p1, p2)
                for i in range(1,len(p2)):
                    if int(p1[i]) > int(p2[i]):
                        p1.append(p2[0:i])
                        del p2[0:i]
                    if int(p2[i]) > int(p1[i]):
                        p2.append(p1[0:i])
                        del p1[0:i]
                    else:
                        continue
            else:
                print(p1, p2)
                for i in range(1,len(p2)):
                    if int(p1[i]) > int(p2[i]):
                        p1.append(p2[0:i])
                        del p2[0:i]
                    if int(p2[i]) > int(p1[i]):
                        p2.append(p1[0:i])
                        del p1[0:i]
                    else:
                        continue
    while len(p1) > 0 and len(p2) > 0:
         game()
    print("player 1 has", p1, " and player 2 has ", p2)
    if len(p1) == 0:
        print("Player 2 wins")
    elif len(p2) == 0:
        print("Player 1 wins")
    input("Press enter to exit")

But each time I run it it plays fine until it gets a tie. As soon as it's comparing any values other than the first two it prints this error:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#12>", line 1, in <module>
    main()
  File "C:\Users\Jesse\Documents\Jesse\homework\Computer Science\Programs\War.py", line       52, in main
    game()
  File "C:\Users\Jesse\Documents\Jesse\homework\Computer Science\Programs\War.py", line      32, in game
     if p1[i] > p2[i]:
 TypeError: unorderable types: int() > list()

What does this mean? And what is the difference between comparing the first two and any other two?

share|improve this question
    
Sounds like you are comparing a list with an integer which makes no sense for obvious reasons. The relevant line is not in your code in the way it shows up in the error so it's hard to help you... –  ThiefMaster Nov 14 '12 at 8:02
1  
The is no if p1[i] > p2[i]: line in your code... –  martineau Nov 14 '12 at 8:05
add comment

3 Answers 3

Seems like you are using Python3. Python2 would allow you to compare int and list, but it wasn't very useful and would mask a bug like you have here

I think perhaps you mean to use extend here

                    p1.append(p2[0:i])

and here

                    p2.append(p1[0:i])

instead of append

share|improve this answer
add comment

A couple of misc. tips (you've got an answer to your direct question though):

m = randint(0,len(cards))
p1.append(cards[m-1])
del cards[m-1]

You're creating work for yourself here. There's a handy function in the random module called randrange which means you don't have to worry about subtracting one (which incidently could mean if you get 0, then you'll have -1, which is the last element of the list, and leads to problems (ie, you're fixing the deck))... Also, lists have a handy method called pop which removes from the list the element from a certain position, so the above could be:

p1.append(cards.pop(randrange(len(cards))))

However, since you're dealing with cards, there's a very aptly named method (again in random), called shuffle:

from random import shuffle

cards = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 ,12] # * 4
shuffle(cards)
# [3, 4, 11, 9, 6, 2, 12, 5, 8, 1, 10, 7]

Using that, you can do much less "manual work", so let's deal the cards...:

>>> p1hand, p2hand = cards[::2], cards[1::2]
>>> p1hand
[3, 11, 6, 12, 8, 10]
>>> p2hand
[4, 9, 2, 5, 1, 7]
share|improve this answer
add comment

The issue you are having is derived from this line (and its variants):

p1.append(p2[0:i])

What this does is append a slice from the list p2 onto the end of p1. That is, it adds a new list as a member of the existing list. This causes trouble later when you try to do a comparison between an integer in one list and a sub-list in the other.

Instead, you want to use extend which will add the members of the slice onto the end of the other list.

p1.extend(p2[0:i]) # note that the 0 here is not necessary!

This should fix the issue.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much, that is enormously helpful. –  Confused Programmer Nov 14 '12 at 8:16
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.