Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I want to implement such a map,

Map<Class<T>, T> m;

in which, I can get a generic object of type T, given the class of T.

I know you may say, you can wrap a Map<String, Object> and use casting to archive this.

I know this.

But imagine the map is Map<Class<T>, Collection<T>>, in which, the value is a very large collection.

I don't want to traverse the collection and cast every object, since the collection is too large.

So? what do I do?

share|improve this question
    
Do you mean "wrap a Map<Class, Object>"? –  Peter Lawrey Nov 14 '12 at 9:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't want to traverse the collection and cast every object, since the collection is too large.

I wouldn't worry about it because

  • you should never need to do this
  • generics are a compile time check so casting to a generic doesn't do anything at runtime.

e.g. If T extends Object, casting a Object to T doesn't do anything. Similarly cast Collection to Collection<T> doesn't do anything at runtime.

But imagine the map is Map<Class<T>, Collection<T>>, in which, the value is a very large collection.

If you imagine this will do something, casting is not the answer. You may need to convert the contents of the Collection but that is completely different in Java.

share|improve this answer

Guava has something similar, it's called ClassToInstanceMap.

You can read more about it in a dedicated Wiki section.

But apparently what you need is a ClassToInstanceMultimap. There is none yet, but you could file a feature request.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for this! I did not know that. But I think i'll give the best answer to @Peter Lawrey. His answer really solves the problem. –  Shiva Wu Nov 16 '12 at 1:19
    
@ShivaWu I agree –  Sean Patrick Floyd Nov 16 '12 at 8:41

Note that as Java uses type erasure, an implementation will in fact have the type of a

Map<?, ?> = Map<Object, Object>

You can trivially write a safe accessor method that gives you the desired type safety, and e.g. does a instanceOf check:

public class InstanceMap extends HashMap<Class<?>, Object> {
    public <T> T getInstance(Class<T> cls) {
        Object o = super.get(cls);
        if (o != null && cls.isInstance(o)) {
            return (T) o;
        } else {
            return null;
        }
    }

    public <T> void putInstance(Class<T> cls, T value) {
        super.put(cls, value);
    }

    @Deprecated
    public Object get(Object key) {
        return super.get(key);
    }
}

This will work fine unless you start using types that themselves are generic. Class<? super T> will then help a bit. But overall, it mostly gives you a false sense of type safety. This kind of map does not give you the strong type safety you are used to. In the end, it is little more than a cast.

I have used such maps before, but after using them for 1-2 years I in the end largely eliminated them again from my code during cleanup phase. They were a hack, and did not give me as much benefits as I expected them to give.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.