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I'm using

Ruby version 1.9.3-p327 RVM 1.16.17 gem 1.8.24

If I perform a :

gem list

I got following result.

Why do I have two version numbers for bundler (1.2.1, 1.1.3) ? :

*** LOCAL GEMS ***

actionmailer (3.2.9)
actionpack (3.2.9)
activemodel (3.2.9)
activerecord (3.2.9)
activeresource (3.2.9)
activesupport (3.2.9)
arel (3.0.2)
builder (3.0.4)
bundler (1.2.1, 1.1.3)
erubis (2.7.0)
hike (1.2.1)
i18n (0.6.1)
journey (1.0.4)
json (1.7.5)
mail (2.4.4)
mime-types (1.19)
multi_json (1.3.7)
polyglot (0.3.3)
rack (1.4.1)
rack-cache (1.2)
rack-ssl (1.3.2)
rack-test (0.6.2)
rails (3.2.9)
railties (3.2.9)
rake (
rdoc (3.12)
rubygems-bundler (1.0.2)
rvm (
sprockets (2.2.1)
thor (0.16.0)
tilt (1.3.3)
treetop (1.4.12)
tzinfo (0.3.35)
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

you can have multiple versions of gems - rubygems allows that!

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Ok but is it normal to have two different version inside the same gemset ? i.e. : if I do a "gem list bundle -d" both version are inside the 'default' gemset. – Douglas Nov 14 '12 at 14:23
rubygems allows inheriting gemsets, the gem does not have to be part of the @default gemset, you can make sure you list gems from it with: GEM_PATH="$GEM_HOME" gem list, to see gems from @global(inherited) gemset: rvm @global do gem list – mpapis Nov 14 '12 at 17:40
Even with GEM_PATH="$GEM_HOME" gem list I see two version of bundler. How to be sure which one is used then ? – Douglas Nov 14 '12 at 20:57
@Douglas rubygems always uses latest version unless you tell it to use other version: bundler _1.1.3_ exec rails server, the simplest thing to do is to uninstall bundler from @global: rvm @global do gem uninstall -ax bundler and install only proper version per gemset: rvm use 1.9.3@my-project; gem install bundler -v 1.1.3 – mpapis Nov 16 '12 at 6:25

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