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Codenarc is a framework that analyzes Groovy code for defects, bad practices, inconsistencies, style issues and more.

Is there a reason for this rule: MisorderedStaticImports Rule:

Checks for static import statements which should never be after nonstatic imports.

Examples of violations:

import my.something.*
import static foo.bar.*

public class MyClass{}

I don't understand the motivation or implications for this rule.

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4  
It's convention only. As far as Java is concerned, it is irrelevant. –  Marko Topolnik Nov 14 '12 at 9:43
    
IntelliJ's formatter places static imports after normal imports by default. –  Peter Lawrey Nov 14 '12 at 9:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As Marko Topolnik says, the order of the imports is not relevant to the meaning of a program.

I tried looking at the JLS for an explicit statement to that effect, but I couldn't find one. And the Java Tutorial doesn't mention import order either. However, the semantics of import are such that it makes no difference. If the imports result in any potential ambiguity due to import order, the JLS says it is a compilation error.

Therefore, this is just a stylistic convention. (Indeed, if you look at the rule, it even gives you the option of putting the static imports first!)

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A style issue. There will be just one, two static imports, but which have a great impact on the understandability like introducing function names. Hence placing them at the top (for reading) might be considered good style. The IDE collapsing "[+]" support might have been taken in consideration too.

I think they wanted the static imports to be separated from the other ones.

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