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I am trying to guess how much data is in pipe, and I don't want to use while(read) because it is blocking until EOF.

Is there any way to do that?

I real I want something like this:

i = pipe1.size();
pipe1.read(i);

I say again, I don't want to use while (read) because it is blocking until EOF.

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It seems like you might need to make the pipe nonblocking, or use select to know when it has data to read. –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 14 '12 at 10:57
    
Not exactly. My pipe is getting data for a long time, I want to read data that is in pipe after a while. I am using fork also and can not use thread. –  Hamed JML Nov 14 '12 at 11:07
    
The idea is good but in my case data enters pipe fast and sequentially. –  Hamed JML Nov 14 '12 at 11:17
    
cat /dev/zero | your_application; how much data is in that pipe? –  Matteo Italia Nov 14 '12 at 13:19

2 Answers 2

The amount of data coming from a pipe could be infinite, just a like a stream, there's no concept of size in a pipe. if you don't want it to block if there's nothing to read you should set the O_NONBLOCK flag when calling pipe2():

pipe2(pipefd, O_NONBLOCK);

This way when you call read() if there's no data it would fail and set errno to EWOULDBLOCK

if (read(fd, ...) < 0) {
   if (errno == EWOULDBLOCK) {
      //no data
   }
   //other errors
}

From the man page:

O_NONBLOCK: Set the O_NONBLOCK file status flag on the two new open file descriptions. Using this flag saves extra calls to fcntl(2) to achieve the same result.

You could also use select() on a blocking pipe to timeout.

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Not exactly. My pipe is getting data for a long time, I want to read data that is in pipe when user asks for it. I am using fork also and can not use thread. –  Hamed JML Nov 14 '12 at 11:09
    
@HamedJML You can read from the pipe whenever you want. If there is nothing in the pipe you will get the EWOULDBLOCK error, and can go back to doing something else. You should be careful when writing to the pipe though, as it has a kind of small buffer and the writer will block when the buffer is full. –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 14 '12 at 11:17
    
The idea is good but in my case data enters pipe fast and sequentially. –  Hamed JML Nov 14 '12 at 11:19
    
@HamedJML it doesn't matter the OS buffers the data until you read. –  mux Nov 14 '12 at 11:23

This could help you, however it is unix specific:

#include <iostream>

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/ioctl.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <errno.h>

int pipe_fd; /* your pipe's file descriptor */

......

int nbytes = 0;

//see how much data is waiting in buffer
if ( ioctl(pipe_fd, FIONREAD, &nbytes) < 0 )
{
    std::cout << "error occured: " << errno;
}
else 
{
    std::cout << nbytes << " bytes waiting in buffer";
}
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