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This has probably been asked before, but googling for keywords like "IN" doesn't work very well.

This is my query:

UPDATE tblCustomer SET type = 2 
WHERE idcustomer                                
IN (SELECT fidcustomer1
    FROM tblorder                   
     UNION                      
    SELECT fidcustomer2
    FROM tblorder                   
   )                                

To break it down: I want to set the type (just an int) of all customers to 2 for all customers that appear in the order-table, in one of either column.

On my test data, none of these tables contain more than a few hundred rows, yet the query runs for many minutes (even without the UNION, that doesn't seem to make much of a difference), apparently re-doing the inner query once per row in customer. I could obviously rewrite it into a single SELECT DISTINCT(id), followed by a few hundred single-row updates and do the logic in whatever language I use for my ODBC-access, but that's just a hack.

How can I rewrite this properly?

Addendum: The table I want to update contains a lot of relatively large BYTEA blobs, a few MB per row. They are set to Storage External or Extended, but I wonder if that could make the sequential scans slow. All updates seem to take a long time, not just this one.

share|improve this question
    
EXPLAIN ANALYZE is useful for performance questions. See stackoverflow.com/tags/postgresql-performance/info – Craig Ringer Nov 14 '12 at 11:21
up vote 3 down vote accepted
-------------------------------
-- Use two EXISTS:
-------------------------------
UPDATE tblCustomer tc
SET type = 2
WHERE EXISTS (
    SELECT *
    FROM tblorder ex
    WHERE ex.fidcustomer1 = tc.idcustomer
    )
OR EXISTS (
    SELECT *
    FROM tblorder ex
    WHERE ex.fidcustomer2 = tc.idcustomer
    );

-------------------------------
-- or combine the two EXISTS::
-------------------------------
UPDATE tblCustomer tc
SET type = 2 
WHERE EXISTS (
    SELECT *
    FROM tblorder ex
    WHERE ex.fidcustomer1 = tc.idcustomer
    OR ex.fidcustomer2 = tc.idcustomer
    );

My gut feeling is that the first version (with two separate exists) will perform better, because the executor could short-circuit if one of the existss would yield True. That would avoid the removal-of-duplicates phase (and probably sorting), which is inherent to the UNION construct.

share|improve this answer
    
With lots of duplicates this might be faster than my solution. For just 10 - 20 % probably not. The proof of the pudding is in the eating. – Erwin Brandstetter Nov 14 '12 at 13:25
    
The problem is that the removal-of-duplicates also has to take place if no actual duplicates are present (the planner cannot know this). The sorting step (N log N) will always be needed, (unless a very small amount of data is to be processed, and hash or bitmap/index operations can be used). A little experimentation indicated that my two-exists version was always the fastest. Sometimes Erwin#2 was about the same (and sometimes it even produced the same query plan). Note: I added indexes on FK1 and FK2. – wildplasser Nov 15 '12 at 0:45
    
I've switched my implementation to a variant of your version. They all perform very similar on my data, but this one works in SQLite, whereas the UPDATE FROM variants do not. – Kajetan Abt Nov 28 '12 at 11:22

I suggest a simpler approach:

UPDATE tblCustomer c
SET    type = 2 
FROM   tblorder o
WHERE  c.idcustomer IN (o.fidcustomer1, o.fidcustomer2)
AND    c.type IS DISTINCT FROM 2  -- optional, to avoid empty updates

Except, if there are duplicates in tblorder, then a similar approach to what you had is sensible:

UPDATE tblCustomer c
SET    type = 2 
FROM  (
    SELECT fidcustomer1 AS cust FROM tblorder
    UNION
    SELECT fidcustomer2 FROM tblorder
    ) o
WHERE  c.idcustomer = o.cust
AND    c.type IS DISTINCT FROM 2;

Either way, in PostgreSQL, joining in a table regularly performs better than an IN expression.

share|improve this answer
    
In my test database, the duplicates are sparse. In the real environment, I expect some customers to be responsible for as much as 10% to 20% of the orders and duplicates the norm. – Kajetan Abt Nov 14 '12 at 11:22
    
@Kdansky: Then go with the second query. UNION removes the dupes. Any remaining performance problems would not be due to this query. You would have to inspect your table more closely. Triggers? Heavy concurrent write load? – Erwin Brandstetter Nov 14 '12 at 11:25
    
This version performs fast enough. Thanks. – Kajetan Abt Nov 14 '12 at 11:29

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