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The case arises where one wants certain options to be publicly available, but others to only be internally or privately available within an assembly or class respectively.

What is the most elegant way of doing this?

The following would be perfect, but isn't possible:

public enum EActions
{
    internal Shutdown,
    Read,
    Write,
    Update
}

...

public void DoSomething(EActions action, int param2, int param3)
{
    // act
}

...

public:

   DoSomething(Read/Write/Update);
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As you tagged this question with design-patterns, I recommend that you replace this enum with a abstract base class, and replace the items with derived classes. Then create static instances in the base class for each child class. –  LMB Nov 14 '12 at 11:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As you tagged this question with design-patterns, I recommend that you replace this enum with a abstract base class, and replace the items with derived classes. Then create static instances in the base class for each child class.

public abstract class EAction
{
    public abstract void DoYourDeal();


    internal static readonly ShutDownEAction  Shutdown = new ShutDownEAction() ; 
    public static readonly ReadEAction Read = new ReadEAction() ;
    //...
}

    public class ReadEAction : EAction {...}
    public class WriteEAction : EAction {...}
    public class UpdateEAction : EAction {...}
    internal class ShutDownEAction : EAction {...}

public void DoSomething(EAction action)
{
    action.DoYourDeal();
}
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This is a good idea, and one I've used. I was hoping there would be a "lighter weight" solution. –  IanC Nov 14 '12 at 11:56
1  
@IanC This is for sure lighter than using enums, beacuse enums always creates switches and other misplaced functions. –  LMB Nov 14 '12 at 11:59
    
I never thought about that. You're right. –  IanC Nov 14 '12 at 11:59
    
One question I just thought of: how would you call this as if you were passing an enum? In the example you show, it seems to me you'd have to use delegates. –  IanC Nov 14 '12 at 13:05
1  
@IanC I see! The DoSomething method shouldn't be aware of what it's doing. Therefore, param1 & param2 should be members of EAction, or of a new class, like class Job { string param1; string param2; EAction action; void DoYourDeal() { action.Run(param1, param2); } }. Search Google for Command Pattern. –  LMB Nov 14 '12 at 13:24

You can use Extensible enum and control the accessibility as desired.

Extensible Enum

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