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In a slight mental tangle and I expect this is easier than I imagine. Got the following tables:

create table #x
(
handid int,
cardid int
)
insert into #x
values
(1,2),(1,3),(1,4),(1,5),(1,6),(1,7),(1,8),
(2,2),(2,3),(2,4),(2,300),(2,400),(2,500),(2,8),
(3,2),(3,3),(3,4),(3,300),(3,400),(3,7),(3,8),
(4,2),(4,300),(4,400),(4,500),(4,6),(4,7),(4,8)


create table #winners(cardid int)
insert into #winners values(300),(400),(500)

select a.* 
from 
        #x a 
        inner join #winners b
            on
            a.cardid = b.cardid 

This returns the following:

enter image description here

I only want this query to return the rows when all of the three cardids exists for a handid. So the desired result set would not include handid 3.

This is a model of reality. In reality #x contains 500 mill records.

EDIT

Ok - there are actually winners that are made up of sets of data from #winners which have a variable number of records. So amending the original code to the following the result set should not include handId 1 or handId 3. I am also getting some unwanted duplicate records in the result set:

create table #x
(
handid int,
cardid int
)
insert into #x
values
(1,2),(1,3),(1,4),(1,5),(1,6),(1,7),(1,8000),
(2,2),(2,3),(2,4),(2,300),(2,400),(2,500),(2,8),
(3,2),(3,3),(3,4),(3,300),(3,400),(3,7),(3,8),
(4,2),(4,300),(4,400),(4,500),(4,6),(4,7),(4,8)


create table #winners(winningComb char(1), cardid int)
insert into #winners values('A',300),('A',400),('A',500),('B',8000),('B',400)

select a.* 
from 
        #x a 
        inner join #winners b
            on
            a.cardid = b.cardid 
share|improve this question
    
Looks like the wrong table design. Probably a handid, card1id, card2id, card3id would be better suited for the requirement. –  Oded Nov 14 '12 at 11:48
1  
The name for this is relational division. For 500m records what indexes do you have? How many cardids on average per hand? How many different cardids in total in the table? How many will you generally be trying to match? Depending on the answers to this question you may be better off doing repeated joins than a group by. –  Martin Smith Nov 14 '12 at 11:49
    
looks like I'd better EDIT the OP! –  whytheq Nov 14 '12 at 11:52
    
@MartinSmith: 7 cardIds per hand. 52 different cardIds in the table. The #winners table will have 4m or 5m different winningComb –  whytheq Nov 14 '12 at 12:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can use something like this:

select handid
from #x  
where cardid in (select cardid from #winners)
group by handid
having count(handid) = (select count(distinct cardid)
                         from #winners);

See SQL Fiddle with Demo

Result:

| HANDID |
----------
|      2 |
|      4 |

Based on your edit, here is an attempt that returns the correct result however I am not sure if it will work with the larger dataset that you have:

;with cte as
(   
    select w1.cardid, w1.winningComb, w2.ComboCardCount
    from winners w1
    inner join
    (
        select COUNT(*) ComboCardCount, winningComb
        from winners
        group by winningComb
    ) w2
        on w1.winningComb = w2.winningComb
) 
select a.handid
from x a
inner join cte b
    on a.cardid = b.cardid
where a.cardid in (select cardid from cte)
group by handid, b.ComboCardCount
having COUNT(a.handid) = b.ComboCardCount

See SQL Fiddle with Demo

Result:

| HANDID |
----------
|      2 |
|      4 |
share|improve this answer
    
+1 This produces the right answer without hardcoding the number of expected answers - its trivial to finish the question from here –  amelvin Nov 14 '12 at 11:56
    
apologies for changing the question after people have already worked on answers but I added the extra complexity into the OP –  whytheq Nov 14 '12 at 12:02
    
@whytheq how do you know what the winning combination is? Do they have to have all values in each set? –  bluefeet Nov 14 '12 at 12:03
    
anything specified in #winners is a winning combination!! ... to be specific - 'winningComb A' might be a Royal flush in Diamonds, whereas 'winningComb B' might be a pair of Twos (diamond and spade); so how many ways are there to win at poker - lots!! –  whytheq Nov 14 '12 at 12:08
    
@whytheq - YOU need to add a score to each hand (in whatever table handid refers to). Then you can order by that score and pick the top 1. There is a plethora of information online about how to assign a poker hand a ranking score. –  MatBailie Nov 14 '12 at 12:14

try this:

with cte as
(select a.* 
from 
        #x a 
        inner join #winners b
            on
            a.cardid = b.cardid ),
cte1 as 
     (select *,ROW_NUMBER() over(partition by handid order by cardid)  as row_num
       from cte),
cte2 as
     (select handid from cte1 where row_num=(select COUNT(*) from #winners) )
select * from cte where handid in (select handid from cte2)


SQL fiddle demo

share|improve this answer

You can change your query to

select a.*, count(a.*) as a_count 
from 
    #x a 
    inner join #winners b
        on
        a.cardid = b.cardid 
group by a.handid 
having a_count = 3
share|improve this answer
1  
Why do you think that the number of cardids is always 3? –  Tim Schmelter Nov 14 '12 at 11:54
    
@TimSchmelter - my fault Tim as the OP before EDIT was not very clear –  whytheq Nov 14 '12 at 12:09

@Bluefleets (+1) approach looks good in terms of performance for the data set; I guess with 500 million records the performance profile will change.

I think the OP wants the output in a slightly different format, something that a slight adaptation to @Bluefleet's code produces:

select * from #x where handid in (
select handid
from #x  
where cardid in (select cardid from #winners)
group by handid
having count(handid) = (select count(distinct cardid)
                         from #winners)
)
and cardid in (select cardid from #winners)

I would also consider the dread cursor solution - as it may perform better over a massive number of records depending on the data structure, indexes, number of winners and so on.

But without the full dataset I cant really say.

share|improve this answer

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