Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am replacing an image on a page on a timer using setInterval in javascript (it's a stats graph that needs to be up to date).

I am using the following code:

var tid = setInterval(mycode, 20000);
function mycode() {
    var theDate = new Date();
    var mili = theDate.getUTCDate() + theDate.toLocaleTimeString() + theDate.getMilliseconds();
    var img = $('<img />')
        .attr('src', '@Url.Action("Chart", "Home", new {ForceNoCache = "theDate"})')
        .attr('id', 'GraphImage')
        .load(function () 
        {
            if (!this.complete || typeof this.naturalWidth == "undefined" || this.naturalWidth == 0) 
            {
                alert('broken image!');
            } 
            else 
            {
                $('#GraphImage').replaceWith(img);
            }
        });
        img.attr('src', img.attr('src').replace("theDate", mili));
}

The image is currently just sitting in a div on the page like this:

    <div style="float:left;margin-right:20px">
    <img id="GraphImage" alt="Graph of Results" src="@Url.Action("ChartImage", "Home")" /> 
  </div>

This code works and replaces the image every 20 seconds - however, even though I'm using the .load function and not replacing the image until it is fully loaded, I still get an annoying little flicker as the browser swaps the image over.

How would I go about using a jQuery fade transition/animation to smoothly swap over the two images? Ideally I'd like a way to do this without needing too much in the way of additional markup gumph or css limitations on how the image can be styled and positioned in the page.

Similar to this question: Javascript Image Reloading; flickers

However I am already using the accepted answer on this question, and still getting flicker.

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Every time mocode() fires, you appear to create a new <img /> and replace the previous one. You will get a much smoother effect by reusing the same <img> - just change its src.

I'm not sure exactly how your code works so it's difficult to be certain but I think you need something like this :

function graphError() {
    alert('Graph: reload failed');
}
var $graphImg = $("#GraphImage").on('error', graphError);
var tid = setInterval(mycode, 20000);
function mycode() {
    var theDate = new Date();
    var mili = theDate.getUTCDate() + theDate.toLocaleTimeString() + theDate.getMilliseconds();
    $.ajax({
        url: '@Url.Action("Chart", "Home", new {ForceNoCache = "theDate"})',
    }).done(function(srcURL) {
        $graphImg.attr('src', srcURL.replace("theDate", mili));
    }).error(graphError);
}

You may need to build the url differently, and with a little thought the error message could be made more specific.

EDIT

Tyco, your solution looks good and if it works maybe you will want to stick with it. Meanwhile I've been playing with a similar idea but dramatically different code centered around jQuery's Deferreds. These are a little mind-blowing if you've not used them but are very useful when you have asynchronous tasks.

In your case, you have three sequential asynchronous tasks, fetching the graph URL, loading the graph image, and fading out the previous graph to reveal the new version.

Coding this is fairly straightforward but the code needs to be error-tolerant - in particular it needs to cater for server responses (URL and the image itself) arriving back in the wrong order or after the next firing of the setInterval. Deferreds help enormously by providing the means to cancel function chains established at the previous iteration.

With a 20 second interval, there shouldn't be a problem, but one day the internet/server may be running exceptionally slowly or you may decide to reduce the interval.

Unless you have used Deferreds before, the code below will look very alien but, barring errors on my part, it should do the job.

Javascript:

$(function() {
    var $graphImg1 = $("#GraphImage1");
    var $graphImg2 = $("#GraphImage2");

    var promises = {
        fetchGraphUrl: null,
        loadImg: null,
        fadeOut: null
    };

    var graph_errors = {
        threshold: 5,//set low for testing, higher in production environment.
        count: 0
    };
    var interval = 5;//seconds

    $graphImg2.on('error', function() {
        if(promises.loadImg) {
            promises.loadImg.reject();
        }
    }).on('load', function() {
        if(promises.loadImg) {
            promises.loadImg.resolve();
        }
    });

    function graph_fetchURL(milli) {
        if(promises.fetchGraph) {
            promises.fetchGraph.reject(milli, 'fetchURL', 'timeout');
        }
        var dfrd = promises.fetchGraph = $.Deferred().fail(function() {
            jqXHR.abort();
        });
        var jqXHR = $.ajax({
            url: '@Url.Action("Chart", "Home", new {ForceNoCache = "theDate"})'
        }).done(function(srcURL) {
            dfrd.resolve(milli, srcURL);
        }).fail(function(jqXHR, textStatus, errorThrown) {
            dfrd.reject(milli, 'ajax', textStatus);
        });
        return dfrd.promise();
    }

    function graph_loadImg(milli, srcURL) {
        if(promises.loadImg) {
            promises.loadImg.reject(milli, 'loadImg', 'timeout');
        }
        //An extra deferred is needed here because $graphImg2's handlers don't know about milli.
        var dfrd = $.Deferred();
        promises.loadImg = $.Deferred().done(function() {
            dfrd.resolve(milli);
        }).fail(function() {
            dfrd.reject(milli, 'loadGraph', 'load error');
        });
        $graphImg2.attr('src', srcURL.replace("theDate", milli));
        return dfrd.promise();
    }

    function graph_fade(milli) {
        if(promises.fadeOut) {
            promises.fadeOut.reject(milli, 'fade', 'timeout');
        }
        promises.fadeOut = $.Deferred();
        $graphImg2.show();
        $graphImg1.fadeOut('fast', function() {
            promises.fadeOut.resolve(milli);
        });
        return promises.fadeOut.promise();
    }

    function graph_swap() {
        $graphImg1.attr('src', $graphImg2.attr('src')).show();
        $graphImg2.hide();
    }

    function graph_error(timestamp, phase, txt) {
        var txt = txt ? (' (' + txt + ')') : '';
        console.log(timestamp + ': fetchGraph failed in the ' + phase + ' phase' + txt);
        if(++graph_errors.count >= graph_errors.threshold) {
            clearInterval(tid);
            console.log('fetchGraph errors exceeded threshold (' + graph_errors.threshold + ')');
        }
        return $.Deferred().promise();//an unresolved, unrejected promise prevents the original promise propagating down the pipe.
    }

    function fetchGraph() {
        var now = new Date();
        var milli = now.getUTCDate() + now.toLocaleTimeString() + now.getMilliseconds();
        graph_fetchURL(milli)
            .pipe(graph_loadImg, graph_error)
            .pipe(graph_fade, graph_error)
            .pipe(graph_swap, graph_error);//this .pipe() chain is the glue that puts everything together.
    }
    fetchGraph();
    var tid = setInterval(fetchGraph, interval * 1000);
});

CSS:

#graphWrapper {
    position: relative;
    float: left;
    margin-right: 20px;
}
#GraphImage, #GraphImage2 {
    position: absolute;
    left: 0;
    top: 0;
    width: XXpx;
    height: YYpx;
}
#GraphImage2 {
    display: none;
}

HTML:

<div id="graphWrapper">
    <img id="GraphImage1" alt="Graph of Results" src="" /> 
    <img id="GraphImage2" alt="" src="" /> 
</div>

As you will see, everything is organised into a bunch of fairly concise functions, each a variation on a common theme, namely :-

  • to reject any outstanding task of the same kind from a previous iteration
  • to create a deferred that can be rejected at the next iteration
  • to perform the task itself
  • to return a promise derived from the Deferred

The last task, graph_swap(), is straightforward and the error handler graph_error() is slightly different.

See comments in code for further details.

In addition to handling errors and tardy server responses, a MAJOR advantage of this approach is that the main iterator function, fetchGraph() becomes VERY simple. The really clever line is a set of chained pipe() commands which sequence the tasks and route any errors to the error handler.

I have tested this as much as I can and think that, like your own solution, it will give a smooth transition.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting idea. I've tried this out and sadly it's not noticably different from the version which replaces the whole img tag. I think the issue relates to the actual rendering of the new image by the browser (the flicker becomes far more obvious as the image dimensions increase). I still have a feeling that the solution is related to rendering the image transparent and then fading it in rather than trying to speed up the swapping. –  Tyco Kaine Nov 14 '12 at 14:28
    
Tyco, something else has just occurred to me. Using my approach, and assuming the graph image always to have the same dimensions, ensure the <img> has height and width properties set. This will prevent the document needing to reflow (or thinking it needs to reflow) when the image is replaced, hence much less work for the browser's rendering engine. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Nov 14 '12 at 17:07
    
No joy :( This seems like a reasonable plan for helping minimize the browser's workload, but I'm still not sure that's the route to go - as a side note, I've noticed this kind of re-draw flicker often happens in default Win Forms controls on resize events. With the jQuery animation effects I'm sure it should be possible to load both the existing and the updated images and then fade between them before discarding the original. I'm just not experienced enough with jQeury to get the best technique - I'd probably end up with a bunch of ugly html markup that wasn't actually needed. –  Tyco Kaine Nov 15 '12 at 9:13
    
Tyco, I see you have a working solution but there are possibly some issues you've not considered. See my major edit above. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Nov 16 '12 at 22:34
    
Looks interesting - I'll have to take a while to see if I can work out what that does! The only concern I have is that it currently requires two image tags on the page - but I'm sure that I can use the same tag swapping logic I have in my current solution as well as the Deferreds to get the best of both :) Thanks for the tips :) –  Tyco Kaine Nov 21 '12 at 16:42
show 1 more comment

Here's the solution I've currently settled on - I'm not sure if it's the best way to do this, so any alternative ideas very welcome :)

I used a second image and added the new one underneath the old using z-index and then faded out the old one before removing it from the DOM.

This requires the image to have absolute position inside the containing DIV such that the new one goes directly behind, rather than alongside.

<script>
    // set interval
    var tid = setInterval(mycode, 20000);
    function mycode() {
        var theDate = new Date();
        var mili = theDate.getUTCDate() + theDate.toLocaleTimeString() + theDate.getMilliseconds();
        var img = $('<img />')
            .attr('src', '@Url.Action("Chart", "Home", new {ForceNoCache = "theDate"})')
            .attr('id', 'GraphImageNew')
            .attr('style', 'z-index:: 4;')
            .load(function () {
                if (!this.complete || typeof this.naturalWidth == "undefined" || this.naturalWidth == 0) {
                    alert('broken image!');
                }
                else {
                    $('#GraphContainer').append(img);
                    $('#GraphImage').attr('id', 'GraphImageOld');
                    $('#GraphImageOld').fadeOut(1000, function () {
                        $('#GraphImageOld').remove();
                        $('#GraphImage').attr('style', 'z-index: 5;');
                    });
                    $('#GraphImageNew').attr('id', 'GraphImage');

                }
            });
            img.attr('src', img.attr('src').replace("theDate", mili));

    }
    function abortTimer() { // to be called when you want to stop the timer
        clearInterval(tid);
    }
</script>

This seems to work fine in IE and Firefox - but I've not tested in other browsers.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.