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I have a small switch statement in the header of a portfolio website I'm working on which governs which links are shown on which page. The value of $id comes from the GET variable, ie - '?id=index'.

    switch($id) {
    case "index":
        //Show links to content
    case !"index":
        //Show link to index
    case !"about":
        //show link to about page
}

The issue is that the NOT operator isn't working in the final two cases. I want the link to the index to show when the user is NOT on the index page, and likewise with the about page. Currently, ALL links are shown on the index page (when $id == "index), and NONE are shown on any other pages.

Why might this be?

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4  
no switch case doesn't work this way –  GBD Nov 14 '12 at 12:43

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is so, because it is supposed to be so.

switch compares using the == operator. So in the second case, you are actually testing whether

$id == (!"index")

Which will always evaluate to false since any string would be trueand not true would be false.

Which means, in your case it would be better to use if and else.

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I'm still quite new to programming, what specifically is the difference between $id == !"index" and $id != "index" ? –  Alfie Woodland Nov 14 '12 at 12:53
    
$id != "index" tests whether $id is not equal to "index". $id == !"index" tests whether the negation of "index" (whatever that may be) is equal to $id. –  Oswald Nov 14 '12 at 16:19

Sorry, but what you're trying to do is simply not valid syntax for a switch / case construct.

The closest you'll come to what you're looking for is to use the default option. This works like a final case option, that deals with all values that were not caught by any of the preceding cases.

switch($id) {
    case "index":
        //Show links to content
    case "about":
        //Show link to about page
    default:
        //show link to default page.
}

Also - don't forget the break; at the end of each case block, otherwise it'll fall through to the next one, which can lead to some unexpected bugs.

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!"index" will probably evaluate as false (but I'm little surprised it didn't cause syntax error) and you'll actually having this statement:

switch($id){
    case "index": //...
    case false: // ...
    case false: // ...
}

When you want to use switch, you'll need to do is this way:

switch($id){
    case "index": // ...
    case "about": // ...
    default: 
        // Additional statements here, note that $id != "index" is already covered 
        // by not entering into case "index"
}
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This is because switch cases in PHP are expressions, not scalar values. Even something like case (substr($foo, -2) . "bar"): is valid. –  drrcknlsn Nov 14 '12 at 13:17

What your code is doing is comparing $id against three values: "index", !"index" (whatever it means) and !"about".

I'm not sure about your approach. You should try if/else or ternary operators.

Hope that it helps.

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Switch doesn't offer custom operators.

 switch ( $id ) {
     case 'index':
          // $id == 'index'

          break;

     case 'about':
          // $id == 'about'

          break;

     case 'help':
     case 'info':
           // $id == 'info' or $id == 'help'

           break;

     default:
          // all other cases
}
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The switch case does not accept complex expressions. The not ! operator is a logical operator. It works in expressions like this.

!$x; // true if $x = false

or as a comparison operator:

 $a != $b; // Not equal
 // or 
 $a !== $b // not identical

From the manual.

The case expression of the switch statement may be any expression that evaluates to a simple type, that is, integer or floating-point numbers and strings. Arrays or objects cannot be used here unless they are dereferenced to a simple type.

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surely you can fix this with:

switch($id){
    case ($id != 'index'):
        echo 'this is not index';
        break;
    case 'index':
        echo 'this is index';
        break;
    case 'foo':
        echo 'this is foo!';
        break;
    default:
        break;
}

However, this example is flawed, because the first case statement will just catch anything that isn't 'index' thus you shouldn't ever get to the case 'foo' nor the default statement

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