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I have a simple (just a test) state machine that accepts the following input strings abc and ac. The state machine is set up as follows:

s1 --> 'a' --> s2
s2 --> 'b' --> s3
s3 --> 'c' --> s4
s2 --> s4 (Epsilon transition)

s1 is the start state
s4 is the accept state

I want to use TPL to execute s1->s2->s3->s4 and s1->s2->s3->s4 in parallel (independent of each other).

If I pass in 'abc' as the input the machine accepts, i.e.

> Thread 1 - Consumed: a, from State: 1 to State: 2
> Thread 2 - Consumed: b, from State: 2 to State: 3
> Thread 3 - Epsilon transition from State: 2 to State: 3
> Thread 4 - Consumed: c, from State: 3 to State: 4
> Thread 4 - Accepted in state 4

Time taken = 19

Input 'abc' is valid Press any key to exit

But, if I pass in 'ac' I get this:

> Thread 1 - Consumed: a, from State: 1 to State: 2
> Thread 2 - Epsilon transition from State: 2 to State: 3
> Thread 3 - Consumed: c, from State: 3 to State: 4
> Thread 3 - Accepted in state 4
> Thread 4 - Consumed: c, from State: 3 to State: 4
> Thread 4 - Accepted in state 4

Time taken = 39

Input 'ac' is not valid (Reason: RejectedAmbiguous) Press any key to exit

For some reason the state machine is accepting the same input twice (accepting in state 4), which shouldn't be possible because both lines of parallel execution accept different inputs.

I won't post all of the code as there is too much of it, but I will post the main bits so you get an idea of what I am doing wrong.

public enum eResult
{
    Accepted = 0,
    RejectedAmbiguous,
    RejectedNoResults,
    RejectedNoInitialState
}

public eResult Execute()
{
    var startState = States.FirstOrDefault(s => s.Initial);
    if (startState == null) return eResult.RejectedNoInitialState;

    tasks.Clear();

    CancellationTokenSource cts = new CancellationTokenSource();
    Task t = new Task(() =>
        {
            foreach(Transition tr in getTransitions(startState))
            {
                var tr = trans[n];
                var actor = new Actor(tr.FromState, this.input);
                Task<Actor> task = Task<Actor>.Factory.StartNew(obj =>
                    {
                        return doTransitionFunction(tr, cts).Invoke((Actor)obj);
                    }, actor, cts.Token);
                buildContinuationTask(Transitions[tr], task, cts);
                tasks.Add(task);
            }
        }, cts.Token);

    t.RunSynchronously();

    try
    {
        Task.WaitAll(tasks.ToArray());
    }
    catch (AggregateException ae)
    {
        foreach (Exception e in ae.Flatten().InnerExceptions)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(e.Message);
        }
    }

    eResult result = eResult.Accepted;

    if (!results.Any()) result = eResult.RejectedNoResults;
    else if (results.Where(r => r.State.Accepted).Count() > 1) result = eResult.RejectedAmbiguous;

    return result;
}

IEnumerable<Transition> getTransitions(AtomicState state)
{
    return Transitions.Keys.Where(k => k.FromState == state);
}

bool isAccept(Actor parcel)
{
    return (parcel.State.Accepted && parcel.Cursor.EOF());
}

Func<object, Actor> doTransitionFunction(Transition transition, CancellationTokenSource cts)
{
    return new Func<object, Actor>(obj =>
    {
        var ts = (Actor)obj;
        var cur = ts.Cursor.Peek();
        if (transition.Epsilon || transition.Input.Invoke() == cur)
        {
            if (!transition.Epsilon) ts.Cursor.MoveNext();
            ts.State = Transitions[transition];
            OnTransitioned(this, new TransitionedEventArgs(transition.FromState, ts.State, cur, transition.Epsilon, Task.CurrentId));
            if (isAccept(ts))
            {
                OnAccepted(this, new AcceptedEventArgs(ts.State, Task.CurrentId));
                results.Add(ts);
                cts.Cancel();
            }
        }
        return ts;
    });
}

void buildContinuationTask(AtomicState s, Task<Actor> antecedentTask, CancellationTokenSource cts)
{
    var trans = getTransitions(s).ToArray();
    for (int n = 0; n < trans.Count(); n++)
    {
        Transition tr = trans[n];
        Task<Actor> continuation = antecedentTask.ContinueWith<Actor>(antecdent =>
            {
                if (!cts.IsCancellationRequested)
                    return doTransitionFunction(tr, cts).Invoke((Actor)antecdent.Result.Clone());
                else
                    return (Actor)antecdent.Result.Clone();
            }, cts.Token, TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion, TaskScheduler.Current);
        buildContinuationTask(Transitions[tr], continuation, cts);
        tasks.Add(continuation);
    }
}

Correct me if this isn't possible, but what I want to happen is this:

For the 1st Parallel Task to accept abc as input:

s1 is a Task<Actor>
s2 is a continuation of s1
s3 is a continuation of s2
s4 is a continuation of s3

For the 2nd Parallel Task to accept ac:

s1 is a Task<Actor>
s2 is a continuation of s1
s3 is a continuation of s2 (this one is the epsilon move)
s4 is a continuation of s3

Both of these tasks have their own copy of the Actor object that will be passed from the main antecedent task into the continuation tasks.

I know I am almost there and I just need to solve this last mystery.

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1  
Just curious, why aren't you using TPL DataFlow? It would simplify much of this. –  casperOne Nov 14 '12 at 15:19
    
I have never heard of TPL DataFlow. Thank's for bringing this to my attention. I will have a read up of it and see if it'll help me solve my problem. +1 for that. –  Mike Clarke Nov 14 '12 at 15:41
    
Would you be open to a TPL DataFlow solution which does what you want, or do you want to stick strictly to the Task-based solution you have now? –  casperOne Nov 14 '12 at 15:42
    
I would accept either. If I can make it work using a Task based solution I'd take that, but if I could do the same using TPL DataFlow that would also be great. It would make it simple for me to see how it'll work using two different methods. –  Mike Clarke Nov 14 '12 at 15:49
    
I have just been reading up on TPL DataFlow and while it appears very powerful I am not sure how it is able to keep track of the multiple Actor state objects when encountering states with multiple transitions? –  Mike Clarke Nov 15 '12 at 6:51
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2 Answers 2

After reading up about TPL DataFlow this is my attempt and it seems to work the way I want.

public interface IScrollableCursor
{
    void MoveNext();
    void MovePrevious();
    void MoveFirst();
    void MoveLast();
    bool BOF();
    bool EOF();
    char Peek();
    int CurrentPosition { get; }
}

[Serializable]
public abstract class AtomicState
{
    protected int stateId;
    protected bool accepted;

    public int StateId
    {
        get
        {
            return stateId;
        }
    }

    public AtomicState( int stateId )
    {
        this.stateId = stateId;
        this.accepted = false;
    }

    public AtomicState( int stateId, bool accepted )
        : this( stateId )
    {
        this.accepted = accepted;
    }

    public abstract bool Initial { get; }

    public bool Accepted
    {
        get
        {
            return accepted;
        }
    }

}


[Serializable]
public struct Actor : ICloneable
{
    private AtomicState state;
    private IScrollableCursor cursor;

    public AtomicState State
    {
        get
        {
            return state;
        }
        set
        {
            state = value;
        }
    }

    public IScrollableCursor Cursor
    {
        get
        {
            return cursor;
        }
    }

    public Actor( AtomicState state, IScrollableCursor cursor )
    {
        this.state = state;
        this.cursor = cursor;
    }

    public object Clone()
    {
        return this.DeepClone();
    }


}

public class Transition
{
    protected AtomicState fromState;
    protected Func<Char> input;
    protected bool epsilon;

    public AtomicState FromState
    {
        get
        {
            return fromState;
        }
    }

    public Func<Char> Input
    {
        get
        {
            return input;
        }
    }

    public bool Epsilon
    {
        get
        {
            return epsilon;
        }
    }

    public Transition( AtomicState fromState, Func<Char> input )
    {
        this.fromState = fromState;
        this.input = input;
    }

    public Transition( AtomicState fromState, bool epsilon )
        : this( fromState, null )
    {
        this.epsilon = epsilon;
    }


}

public class EpsilonTransition : Transition
{
    public EpsilonTransition( AtomicState fromState )
        : base( fromState, true )
    {
    }
}



public eResult Execute()
{
    var startState = States.FirstOrDefault( s => s.Initial );
    if ( startState == null ) return eResult.RejectedNoInitialState;

    tasks.Clear();

    CancellationTokenSource cts = new CancellationTokenSource();

    ExecutionDataflowBlockOptions options = new ExecutionDataflowBlockOptions();
    options.MaxDegreeOfParallelism = 4;
    options.CancellationToken = cts.Token;

    // transitions an actor onto it's next state
    TransformBlock<Tuple<Transition, Actor>, Actor> actorTransitioner = new TransformBlock<Tuple<Transition, Actor>, Actor>( tr =>
        {
            return doTransitionFunction( tr.Item1, cts ).Invoke( tr.Item2 );

        }, options );

    BroadcastBlock<Actor> actorTransitionerBroadcaster = new BroadcastBlock<Actor>( a => { return a; } );

    ActionBlock<Actor> actorProcessor = new ActionBlock<Actor>( a =>
        {
            foreach ( Transition t in getTransitions( a.State ) )
            {
                actorTransitioner.Post( new Tuple<Transition, Actor>( t, (Actor)a.Clone() ) );
            }
        } );

    // link blocks
    actorTransitioner.LinkTo( actorTransitionerBroadcaster );
    actorTransitionerBroadcaster.LinkTo( actorProcessor );

    actorTransitionerBroadcaster.Post( new Actor( startState, input ) );

    try
    {
        actorTransitioner.Completion.Wait();
    }
    catch ( AggregateException ex )
    {
        foreach ( Exception ae in ex.Flatten().InnerExceptions )
        {
            Console.WriteLine( ae.Message );
        }
    }

    eResult result = eResult.Accepted;

    if ( !results.Any() ) result = eResult.RejectedNoResults;
    else if ( results.Where( r => r.State.Accepted ).Count() > 1 ) result = eResult.RejectedAmbiguous;

    return result;
}

I have added the constructs used in my attempt so it's easier to be reproduced. It necessary I will post the entire code (about 12 classes).

share|improve this answer
    
Can you add more about what blocks mapped up with your original constructs? That would help tremendously. –  casperOne Nov 15 '12 at 15:44
    
I have updated my answer with the constructs used by the block mapping. –  Mike Clarke Nov 15 '12 at 16:00
    
Interestingly my solution seems to hang once it finds accepting routes. I am not quite sure how to get the blocks to signal completion so I can return the results back to the caller. –  Mike Clarke Nov 16 '12 at 8:56
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I have managed to answer my own question after coming up with a much simpler solution. I deduced that TPL DataFlow is not suitable for this as it would create circular data networks with no way of determining whether the computation has been completed, or not. So I decided to bin it completely and go back to the drawing board.

I eventually discovered Paralell.ForEach() that does exactly what I wanted, run each transition in parallel by utilizing all processor cores:

public eResult Execute()
{
    var startState = States.FirstOrDefault( s => s.Initial );
    if ( startState == null ) return eResult.RejectedNoInitialState;

    CancellationTokenSource cts = new CancellationTokenSource();
    CancellationToken token = cts.Token;

    Task t = new Task( () =>
        {
            Parallel.ForEach( getTransitions( startState ), new ParallelOptions { MaxDegreeOfParallelism = 4 }, tr =>
            {
                var a0 = new Actor( tr.FromState, (IScrollableCursor)this.input.DeepClone() );
                var a1 = doTransitionFunction( tr, cts ).Invoke( a0 );
                if ( a0.State != a1.State )
                    processRecursively( a1.State, a0, cts );

            } );

        }, cts.Token );

    t.RunSynchronously();


    eResult result = eResult.Accepted;

    if ( !results.Any() ) result = eResult.RejectedNoResults;
    else if ( results.Where( r => r.State.Accepted ).Count() > 1 ) result = eResult.RejectedAmbiguous;

    return result;


}


void processRecursively( AtomicState s, Actor a0, CancellationTokenSource cts )
{
    Parallel.ForEach( getTransitions( s ), tr =>
        {
            var a1 = doTransitionFunction( tr, cts ).Invoke( a0 );
            if ( a0.State != a1.State )
                processRecursively( a1.State, a1, cts );
        } );
}
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