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Before I ask the question I want to let you know that I am not an experienced programmer but someone learning the basics of python on codecademy.com.

I am trying to use python to write a function that checks whether the first letter of a given word, for instance "ball" is a vowel in either uppercase or lowercase. So for instance:

#here is a variable containing a word:
my_word = "Acrobat"

#letters in vowel as a list
the_vowel = ["a","e","i","o","u"]

How do a check that the first letter in "Acrobat" is one of the vowels in the list? I also need to take into consideration whether it is upper or lowercase?

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Thanks to all of you who responded to my question. Your answers have helped me to answer the question. –  Bola Owoade Nov 15 '12 at 13:39
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8 Answers 8

try my_word[0].lower() in the_vowel

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And you can use my_word[0].isupper() to check if the letter is uppercase. –  user1773242 Nov 14 '12 at 13:00
1  
@user1773242: Gefei's answe already forces the string to lower case before checking –  Gary Nov 14 '12 at 13:12
    
Yes, but the question stated: "I also need to take into consideration whether it is upper or lowercase?" Which I read as: "I need to controll if is it upper or lower case" –  user1773242 Nov 14 '12 at 14:08
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I don't know if it is better than the answers already posted here, but you could also do:

vowels = ('a','e','i','o','u','A','E','I','O','U')
myWord.startswith(vowels)
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1  
+1. Nice. I always forget that startswith can take a tuple and end up writing any(word.startswith(prefix) for prefix in prefixes). –  Steven Rumbalski Nov 14 '12 at 13:22
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Here are some hints to help you figure it out.

To get a single letter from a string subscript the string.

>>> 'abcd'[2]
'c'

Note that the first character is character zero, the second character is character one, and so forth.

The next thing to note is that an upper case letter does not compare equal to a lower case letter:

>>> 'a' == 'A'
False

Luckily, python strings have the methods upper and lower to change the case of a string:

>>> 'abc'.upper()
'ABC'
>>> 'a' == 'A'.lower()
True

To test for membership in a list us in:

>>> 3 in [1, 2, 3]
True
>>> 8 in [1, 2, 3]
False

So in order to solve your problem, tie together subscripting to get a single letter, upper/lower to adjust case, and testing for membership using in.

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+1 for being a better teacher than me :) –  gefei Nov 14 '12 at 13:09
    
@gefei: Thanks. Now if I could only figure out why I got the -1. –  Steven Rumbalski Nov 14 '12 at 13:13
    
@StevenRumbalski.. Unfortunately, if there are some on SO who don't like good answers, I added a +1 to compensate the loss.. Nice answer though :) –  Rohit Jain Nov 14 '12 at 13:18
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my_word = "Acrobat"
the_vowel = "aeiou"

if myword[0].lower() in the_vowel:
    print('1st letter is a vowel')
else:
    print('Not vowel')
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thanks to alexvassel who provided me the missing part ;)

so here is the solution to the exercice on codecadmy.com

original = raw_input('Enter a word:')

word = original.lower()

first = word[0]

vowel = "aeiou"



if len(original) > 0 and original.isalpha():

   if first in vowel:

       print 'vowel'

       else:   

       print 'consonant'

else:

  print 'empty'
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ok "if myword[0].lower() in the_vowel:" is shorter but we are learning :D –  user2417270 May 24 '13 at 14:05
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Here's how I did it since the inputted word needs to be checked first before storing it as a variable:

original = raw_input('Enter a word:')

if len(original) > 0 and original.isalpha():
    word = original.lower()
    first = word[0]
    if first in ['a','e','i','o','u']:
        print "vowel"
    else:
        print "consonant"
else:
    print 'empty'
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My code looks like this.

original = raw_input("Enter a word:")
word = original.lower()
first = word[0]
vowel = "aeiou"

if len(original) > 0 and original.isalpha():
    if first in vowel:
        print word
        print first
        print "vowel!"
    else:
        print word
        print first
        print "consonant
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Will it not be (slightly) faster to define the_vowel as a dictionary than a list?

the_vowel = {"a":1,"e":1,"i":1,"o":1,"u":1}
my_word[0].lower() in the_vowel
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