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Some entries in my tab-del file are present singletons, some are paired and I would like to split my file according to the number of occurrence using some Unix command line.

Here is an example

1789:ST65:17  77 * ggfegZPPXX]][][_cbbcaefecbVcbb]aY^BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB
1789:ST65:17  141 * ggbggggagedde^degdggaedebda`aedaaedcecdaa\bdSW\_T
1789:ST65:99  77 * ffcddcMdcdeebeeXecce_``]Pcfd]`aZ_bbK\`aUZZYP]`bb^b
1789:ST65:99  141 * gggggggegggfegggggg`ggeegebgfgeaggeedfeM^`K^`BBBBB
1789:ST65:173  77 * ggfegZPPXX]][][_cbbcaefecbVcbb]aY^BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB
1789:ST65:201  77 * eacegZPPXX]][][_cbbcaef121cacc]aY^BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB
1789:ST65:201  141 * ggbggggeeacaaadggaedebda`aedaaedcecdaa\bdSW\_T

In this simple case, I would like to have a first file paired-entries containing

1789:ST65:17  77 * ggfegZPPXX]][][_cbbcaefecbVcbb]aY^BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB
1789:ST65:17  141 * ggbggggagedde^degdggaedebda`aedaaedcecdaa\bdSW\_T
1789:ST65:99  77 * ffcddcMdcdeebeeXecce_``]Pcfd]`aZ_bbK\`aUZZYP]`bb^b
1789:ST65:99  141 * gggggggegggfegggggg`ggeegebgfgeaggeedfeM^`K^`BBB.
1789:ST65:201  77 * eacegZPPXX]][][_cbbcaef121cacc]aY^BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB
1789:ST65:201  141 * ggbggggeeacaaadggaedebda`aedaaedcecdaa\bdSW\_T

and another file containing only the singletons:

1789:ST65:173  77 * ggfegZPPXX]][][_cbbcaefecbVcbb]aY^BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB

I tried to use uniq or awk but I am lost now. Do you have any suggestions?

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please post some new input using even more complicated text in the last column to make it even harder for us to tell what you want as right now it's only ALMOST impossible. Had you used small simple words like "foo" and "bar" in there it would just have been insulting. –  Ed Morton Nov 14 '12 at 13:43
    
It was clear enough to me, the last column isn't import for the comparison. Split the output base on duplicate's in the first column. –  iiSeymour Nov 14 '12 at 13:55
    
wouldn't it be nice, though, if the poster had stated that he was only interested in the first column and hadn't made the last column so complicated? Don't know about others, but there's only so much effort I'll put into trying to understand a question and if the OPs not putting any effort at all into phrasing it as simply as possible.... –  Ed Morton Nov 14 '12 at 14:25
2  
@EdMorton The example file is shown and the requested output is clearly described. Don't post sarcastic comments because you struggled to understand the question. –  iiSeymour Nov 14 '12 at 16:29
    
@sudo_o Perhaps I could have made the point without sarcasm but the point is valid and more useful long term to the OP than the posted solutions: if you're going to post a question, post sample input that's as simple as possible and describe WHY the posted output is what is desired. That way as many people as possible will be willing to take the time to read your question and give you an answer. It's not about struggling to understand the question, it's about not being inclined to put much effort into helping someone who hasn't put in the minimum effort to state the question clearly. –  Ed Morton Nov 14 '12 at 20:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use uniq to do this:

# Duplicates 
$ uniq -D -w 13 file.txt > duplicates.txt

1789:ST65:17  77 * ggfegZPPXX]][][_cbbcaefecbVcbb]aY^BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB
1789:ST65:17  141 * ggbggggagedde^degdggaedebda`aedaaedcecdaa\bdSW\_T
1789:ST65:99  77 * ffcddcMdcdeebeeXecce_``]Pcfd]`aZ_bbK\`aUZZYP]`bb^b
1789:ST65:99  141 * gggggggegggfegggggg`ggeegebgfgeaggeedfeM^`K^`BBBBB
1789:ST65:201  77 * eacegZPPXX]][][_cbbcaef121cacc]aY^BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB
1789:ST65:201  141 * ggbggggeeacaaadggaedebda`aedaaedcecdaa\bdSW\_T 

# Singletons 
$ uniq -u -w 13 file.txt > singletons.txt

1789:ST65:173  77 * ggfegZPPXX]][][_cbbcaefecbVcbb]aY^BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB

Options:

-u print all unique lines

-D print all duplicate lines

-w compare no more than N characters


Note: this has a flaw if the columns aren't aligned and the different between the longest and shortest string in the first column is greater then 1 (given the two spaces between column one and two).

A simple solution is to use column -t to align the columns:

column -t file.txt | uniq -u -w 13 > singletons.txt

Just remember to increase -w 13 to -w L where L is the length of the longest string.

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Thank you for your help - I will read the man page more carefully next time ... –  pasta Nov 14 '12 at 13:51

One way using awk:

awk 'FNR==NR { array[$1]++; next } { print > (array[$1]==2 ? "pairs" : "singletons") }' file.txt file.txt

Contents of file called 'pairs':

1789:ST65:17  77 * ggfegZPPXX]][][_cbbcaefecbVcbb]aY^BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB
1789:ST65:17  141 * ggbggggagedde^degdggaedebda`aedaaedcecdaa\bdSW\_T
1789:ST65:99  77 * ffcddcMdcdeebeeXecce_``]Pcfd]`aZ_bbK\`aUZZYP]`bb^b
1789:ST65:99  141 * gggggggegggfegggggg`ggeegebgfgeaggeedfeM^`K^`BBBBB
1789:ST65:201  77 * eacegZPPXX]][][_cbbcaef121cacc]aY^BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB
1789:ST65:201  141 * ggbggggeeacaaadggaedebda`aedaaedcecdaa\bdSW\_T

Contents of file called 'singletons':

1789:ST65:173  77 * ggfegZPPXX]][][_cbbcaefecbVcbb]aY^BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB
share|improve this answer

A one-pass approach with awk:

awk '
!seen[$1]++ {
   solo[$1] = $0 ORS
   next
}
{
   print solo[$1] $0 > "pairs"
   delete solo[$1]
}
END {
   for (key in solo) {
      printf "%s", solo[key] > "singletons"
   }
}
' file
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