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Say I have an array that looks like this:

array(100) {
  [0]=>
  array(4) {
    ["player_id"]=>
    string(2) "jk"
    ["date"]=>
    string(10) "2012-11-07"
    ["hits"]=>
    string(4) "1000"
  }
  [1]=>
  array(4) {
    ["player_id"]=>
    string(2) "jk"
    ["date"]=>
    string(10) "2012-11-14"
    ["hits"]=>
    string(4) "2000"
  }
 [2]=>
  array(4) {
    ["player_id"]=>
    string(2) "mc"
    ["date"]=>
    string(10) "2012-11-14"
    ["hits"]=>
    string(4) "1500"
  }
 [3]=>
  array(4) {
    ["player_id"]=>
    string(2) "mc"
    ["date"]=>
    string(10) "2012-11-07"
    ["hits"]=>
    string(4) "2300"
  }

...

And this continues. So, basically I have several players and for each player I have two dates. I would like to end up having an array like this:

array(100) {
      ["jk"]=>
      array(2) {
        ["hits_today"]=>
        string(4) "1000"
        ["hits_difference"]=>
        string(5) "-1000"
      }
     ["mc"]=>
      array(2) {
        ["hits_today"]=>
        string(4) "1500"
        ["hits_difference"]=>
        string(4) "-800"
      }
    ..

Basically I want to process the first array knowing that for each player I (might) have two values, and create an array of arrays that as keys uses the player_id and as components with the difference between those two values, and the value of today.

My concerns are:

  • What is the best way to process the first array?
  • How would I manage if the value of today doesn't exist, or the value of tomorrow doesn't? How can I control that while processing the array?
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1  
Is that array coming from a database by any chance? –  Cups Nov 14 '12 at 14:16
    
Yes it is, but I can't do a self join...I need to post process. –  Hommer Smith Nov 14 '12 at 14:20
    
You don't need a self join. Just get a nicer original array to work with directly from the database first. For example, if you can run two separate queries, both GROUP BY player_id, first one retrieving the values for today (if they exist), the second one retrieving the values for the most recent date except for today. You will end up having two arrays that are much easier to work with. If you want, you could write a more sophisticated SQL to get your second array directly from the database, but it may put too much pressure on the SQL server. –  Bee Nov 14 '12 at 14:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If this comes from a query I would do this instead:

SELECT player_id,
SUM(IF(`date`='$yesterday', hits, 0)) AS hits_yesterday,
SUM(IF(`date`='$today', hits, 0)) AS hits_today
FROM ...
GROUP BY player_id
share|improve this answer
    
This is really clever. I will try to do it. Why use $today and $yesterday though? Can't I just use CURDATE() and DATE_SUB(CURDATE(), INTERVAL 7 DAY) ?? –  Hommer Smith Nov 14 '12 at 14:27
    
@HommerSmith My database server is usually in a different timezone than my application server, so I don't use MySQL's time functions much, but yeah, that should work too :) –  Ja͢ck Nov 14 '12 at 14:37
    
This is awesome. THank you very much! –  Hommer Smith Nov 14 '12 at 14:49
    
Jack I have been thinking over and over, and I fail to see how this works. I mean, how is the SUM in the select able to fetch more than one row?? In other words: If in the first row of results I have player_id = 1, hits = 10, date = "2012-10-14" and the second row I have player_id = 1, hits = 10, date = "2012-10-07", how can the select fetch both and put the result into one? –  Hommer Smith Nov 14 '12 at 21:10
    
The key is GROUP BY. When you group by an entity, for all instances of that entity there is only one record in the result set, however you can still do stuff on the group itself using functions such as COUNT(), SUM(), etc. For each player_id, there is at most one record returned along with hits_yesterday and hits_today for that player_id. –  Bee Nov 14 '12 at 22:37

I needed to preserve the date in the output array to determine if the current date being calculated was > or < the date already on hand, but this is the solution I came up with:

$array = array(
    array("player_id" => "jk", "date" => "2012-11-07", "hits" => "1000"),
    array("player_id" => "jk", "date" => "2012-11-14", "hits" => "2000"),
    array("player_id" => "mc", "date" => "2012-11-14", "hits" => "1500"),
    array("player_id" => "mc", "date" => "2012-11-07", "hits" => "2300")
);

$output = array();
foreach($array as $k=>$v){
    if(!isset($output[$v['player_id']])){
        $output[$v['player_id']]['hits_today'] = $v['hits'];
        $output[$v['player_id']]['hits_difference'] = 0;
        $output[$v['player_id']]['date'] = $v['date'];
    }elseif($v['date'] < $output[$v['player_id']]['date']){
        $output[$v['player_id']]['hits_difference'] = $output[$v['player_id']]['hits_today'] - $v['hits'];
    }elseif($v['date'] > $output[$v['player_id']]['date']){
        $output[$v['player_id']]['hits_difference'] = $output[$v['player_id']]['hits_today'] - $v['hits'];
        $output[$v['player_id']]['hits_today'] = $v['hits'];
        $output[$v['player_id']]['date'] = $v['date'];
    }
}
echo '<pre>';
print_r($output);
echo '</pre>';
?>
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