Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I had some problems with nsolve having a difficulty to find a solution for some functions giving some initial guesses. I wanted then to try numpy/scipy solvers.

Here is a program using sympy and works quite well giving this solution: [0.0, -9.05567e-72, 9.42477, 3.14159]

from sympy import *

# Symbols
theta = Symbol('theta')
phi = Symbol('phi')
phi0 = Symbol('phi0')
H0 = Symbol('H0')
# Constants
phi0 = 60*pi.evalf()/180
a = 0.05
t = 100*1e-9
b = 0.05**2/(8*pi.evalf()*1e-7)
c = 0.001/(4*pi.evalf()*1e-7) 

def m(theta,phi):
    return Matrix([[sin(theta)*cos(phi),sin(theta)*cos(phi),cos(phi)]])
def h(phi0):
    return Matrix([[cos(phi0),sin(phi0),0]])
def k(theta,phi,phi0):
    return m(theta,phi).dot(h(phi0))
def F(theta,phi,phi0,H0): 
    return -(t*a*H0)*k(theta,phi,phi0)+b*t*(cos(theta)**2)+c*t*(sin(2*theta)**2)+t*sin(theta)**4*sin(2*phi)**2
def F_phi(theta,phi,phi0,H0):
    return diff(F(theta,phi,phi0,H0),phi)
def G(phi):
    return F_phi(theta,phi,phi0,H0).subs(theta,pi/2)

H0 = -0.03/(4*pi.evalf()*1e-7)
sol = []
for i in range(5):
    x0=i*pi.evalf()/4
    solution = float(nsolve(G(phi),x0))
    sol.append(solution)
sol = list(set(sol)) # remove duplicate values
print sol

And this is the same program but using numpy compatible functions:

from numpy import *
from scipy.optimize import fsolve
# Constants
phi0 = 60*pi/180
a = 0.05
t = 100*1e-9
b = 0.05**2/(8*pi*1e-7)
c = 0.001/(4*pi*1e-7)

def m(theta,phi):
    return array([sin(theta)*cos(phi),sin(theta)*cos(phi),cos(phi)])
def h(phi0):
    return array([cos(phi0),sin(phi0),0])
def k(theta,phi,phi0):
    return dot(m(theta,phi).T,h(phi0))
def F(theta,phi,phi0,H0): 
    return -(t*a*H0)*k(theta,phi,phi0)+b*t*(cos(theta)**2)+c*t*(sin(2*theta)**2)+t*sin(theta)**4*sin(2*phi)**2
def F_phi(theta,phi,phi0,H0):
    return diff(F(theta,phi,phi0,H0),phi)
def G(phi):
    return F_phi(pi/2,phi,phi0,H0)

H0 = -0.03/(4*pi*1e-7)
sol = []
for i in range(5):
    x0=array([i*pi/4]) # x0 as ndarray argument for fsolve
    solution = float(fsolve(G,x0))
    sol.append(solution)
sol = list(set(sol)) # remove duplicate values
print sol

But when I ran the program:

Traceback (most recent call last):
File "Test4.py", line 27, in <module>
solution = float(fsolve(G,x0))
File "/usr/lib64/python2.7/site-packages/scipy/optimize/minpack.py", line 127, in fsolve
res = _root_hybr(func, x0, args, jac=fprime, **options)
File "/usr/lib64/python2.7/site-packages/scipy/optimize/minpack.py", line 224, in _root_hybr
raise errors[status][1](errors[status][0])
TypeError: Improper input parameters were entered.

I tried giving x0 the value 0 and the second program (with numpy) worked giving a numerical value near to 0, but starting from pi/4, it gives the error message. Did I miss something in numpy ?

share|improve this question
    
Please do not forget to accept an answer that provides solution to your problem (use the tick next to the answer). –  btel Nov 14 '12 at 17:49
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In numpy version function G(array([pi/4])) returns an empty array:

>> G(array([pi/4]))  
array([], dtype=float64)

The problem is in line:

return diff(F(theta,phi,phi0,H0),phi)

numpy.diff calculates differences between consecutive element of the arrays, whereas sympy.diff calculates a derivative. You can modify your own F_phi function to return derivative calculated analytically (if you know the solution) or numerically. For numerical solution you can use:

def F_phi(theta,phi,phi0,H0, eps=1e-12):
    return (F(theta,phi+eps,phi0,H0) - F(theta,phi,phi0,H0))/eps

and analytical solution (calculated with sympy):

def F_phi(theta, phi, phi0, H0):
    return -H0*a*t*(-sin(phi)*sin(phi0)*sin(theta) - sin(phi)*sin(theta)*cos(phi0)) + 4*t*sin(2*phi)*sin(theta)**4*cos(2*phi)

Please remember that numerical solution won't be as precise as analytical. Therefore, there might be still differences between sympy (analytical) and numpy (numerical) approaches.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, the problem was coming from the diff function, which I thought to be the same in both libraries. Indeed, the solution of numpy seems to be different from that of sympy (although in this last case, the solutions are calculated numerically using nsolve, or have I misunderstood the scope of this function?). Besides, depending on the value of eps, I have different solutions: with the value you gave me, I had a warning relative to RuntimeWarning but the set of solutions seem to stabilize for eps<1e-18, which is anyway different from the above solution with sympy. –  aymenbh Nov 14 '12 at 15:59
    
I added analytical solution, which may be more precise. –  btel Nov 14 '12 at 17:39
    
You might also calculate solution % (2*pi) because phi is periodic. With this modifications sympy and numpy solutions are very close! –  btel Nov 14 '12 at 17:44
    
Yes, SymPy will be symbolic whenever possible. NumPy will never be symbolic. –  asmeurer Nov 15 '12 at 8:28
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.