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Does the program execution always start from main in C?

i want to start the execution of my program which contains 2 functions (excluding main)

void check(void)
void execute(void)

i want to start my execution from check(), is it possible in c/c++?

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marked as duplicate by Mike, WhozCraig, Mr. Alien, Tom Redfern, kmp Nov 15 '12 at 9:56

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
This question is asked a lot, do any of these hits on SO answer your question? –  Mike Nov 14 '12 at 14:44
    
not exactly i can say –  joey rohan Nov 14 '12 at 14:46
3  
You can write your own bootstrap code that invokes check() instead of main(). Or you can write main() so it calls check(). The latter is several orders of magnitude easier to do. The C standard says (ISO/IEC 9899:2011 §5.12.2.1 Program Startup) The function called at program startup is named main. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 14 '12 at 14:46
    
The answer to this depends upon which compiler you are using. What is your operating system and compiler? –  Robᵩ Nov 14 '12 at 14:47
1  
Why do you need that? –  Andrey Nov 14 '12 at 15:12

9 Answers 9

You can do this with a simple wrapper:

int main()
{
    check();
}

You can't portably do it in any other way since the standard explicitly specifies main as the program entry point.

EDIT for comment: Don't ever do this in production code Ah yes, you could abuse static initialization to have check called before main during static init, but you still can't call main legally from check. You can just have check run first.

// At file scope.
bool abuse_the_language = check(), true;

int main()
{
    // No op if desired.
}
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i dont have to call main() 1st.have to call check,then main.any idea? –  joey rohan Nov 14 '12 at 14:43
3  
Shame on you for getting upvotes for that (but +1 anyway). –  Kerrek SB Nov 14 '12 at 14:44

Various linkers have various options to specify the entry point. Eg. Microsoft linker uses /ENTRY:function:

The /ENTRY option specifies an entry point function as the starting address for an .exe file or DLL.

GNU's ld uses the -e or ENTRY() in the command file.

Needles to say, modifying the entry point is a very advanced feature which you must absolutely understand how it works. For one, it may cause skipping the loading the standard libraries initialization.

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I have found solution to my own question. we ca simply use –  joey rohan Nov 14 '12 at 15:05
int main()
{
    check();
    return 0;
}
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By the way, return 0; is implied.... –  Kerrek SB Nov 14 '12 at 14:45
6  
In my view, functions that return a value should have a return value; statement at the end. I prefer the code written as shown. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 14 '12 at 14:52
    
and I think a lot of people agree with Jonathan 8^) –  Zane Nov 14 '12 at 14:59

Calling check from main seems like the most logical solution, but you could still explore using /ENTRY to define another entry point for your application. See here for more info.

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You cannot start in something other than main, although there are ways to have some code execute before main.

Putting code in a static initialization block will have the code run prior to main; however, it won't be 100% controllable. while you can be assured it runs prior to main, you cannot specify the order that two static initialization blocks will run prior to them both executing before main.

Linkers and loaders both have the concept of main held as a shared "understood" start of a C / C++ program; however, there is code that runs prior to main. This code is responsible for "setting up the environment" of the program (things like setting up stdin or cin). By putting code in a static initialization block, you effectively say, "hey you need to do this too to have the right environment". Generally, this should be something small, that can stand independently in execution order of other items.

If you need two or three things to execute in order before main, then make them into proper functions and call them at the beginning of main.

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There is a contrived way to achieve that, but it is nothing more than a hack.

The idea is to create a static library containing the main function, and make it call your "check" function. The linker will resolve the symbol when linking against your "program", and your "program" code will indeed not have a main by itself.

This is NOT recommended, unless you have very specific needs (an example that pops to mind is Windows Screensavers, as the helper library that comes with the Windows SDK has a main function that performs specific initialization like parsing the command line).

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It may be supportted by the compiler. For example, gcc, you can use -nostartfiles and --entry=xxx to set the entry point of the program. The default entry point is _start, which will call the function main.

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You can "intercept" the call to main by creating an object before the main starts. The constructor needs to execute your function.

#include <iostream>

void foo()
{
  // do stuff

  std::cout<<"exiting from foo" <<std::endl;
}

struct A
{
  A(){ foo(); };
};

static A a;

int main()
{
  // something
  std::cout<<"starting main()" <<std::endl;
}
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1  
The risk here is that other objects that should have been initialized are not initialized. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 14 '12 at 14:50
    
-1: unless you know by heart the rules of static initialisations... but even this case, I would not constrain the running of any application by events launched due tu static initisalisations. This is totally uncontrolled process flow. –  Stephane Rolland Nov 14 '12 at 15:09
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I have found solution to my own question. we can simply use

#pragma startup function-name <priority>
#pragma exit function-name <priority>

These two pragmas allow the program to specify function(s) that should be called either upon program startup (before the main function is called), or program exit (just before the program terminates through _exit).

The specified function-name must be a previously declared function taking no arguments and returning void; in other words, it should be declared as:

void func(void);

The optional priority parameter should be an integer in the range 64 to 255. The highest priority is 0. Functions with higher priorities are called first at startup and last at exit. If you don't specify a priority, it defaults to 100. thanks!

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1  
Just keep in mind your code is not portable that way. GCC for example doesn't support #pragma startup and will throw a warning –  Mike Nov 14 '12 at 15:19
    
i have mentioned above that i am using turbo c/c++.thanks. –  joey rohan Nov 14 '12 at 15:20

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