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I had one Linux Server with MySQL working, with:

-12 Gb RAM 
-4 x Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E6510  @ 1.73GHz
-CentOS release 6.3
-MySQL 5.1.61

Because of some technical problems, we have had to reduce the RAM memory of the server to 8 GB and for now, we are not able to have any memory. And now, because of this we are having a lot of performance problems on our server. This is the size of our DB:

+--------+--------------------+---------+--------+--------+------------+---------+
| tables | table_schema       | rows    | data   | idx    | total_size | idxfrac |
+--------+--------------------+---------+--------+--------+------------+---------+
|     43 | XXXXXXXX           | 142.81M | 10.52G | 13.31G | 23.83G     |    1.27 |
|     44 | Test_XXXXXXXX      | 55.20M  | 3.57G  | 4.77G  | 8.33G      |    1.34 |
|     34 | XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX   | 23.04M  | 1.39G  | 1.84G  | 3.24G      |    1.32 |
|     23 | mysql              | 0.00M   | 0.00G  | 0.00G  | 0.00G      |    0.16 |
|     28 | information_schema | NULL    | 0.00G  | 0.00G  | 0.00G      |    NULL |
+--------+--------------------+---------+--------+--------+------------+---------+

This is the content of /etc/my.cnf:

[mysqld]

max_allowed_packet = 1024M
sort_buffer_size = 512M
max_connections=500

query_cache_size = 512M
query_cache_limit = 512M
query-cache-type = 2

table_cache = 800

thread_cache_size=8
key_buffer_size = 512M
read_buffer_size=64M
read_rnd_buffer_size=64M
myisam_sort_buffer_size=64M

innodb_flush_log_at_trx_commit=2
innodb_buffer_pool_size=7000M
innodb_additional_mem_pool_size=100M

...

I don't know if I'm able to really identify the relation between the size and the RAM. But the situation is that when I had 12GB RAM everything was working fine. The "innodb_buffer_pool_size" value was 10000M and the performance was really good. But now, takes making the same operation like 4 times more.

Our app is basically one DB exporter and acceses mainly to only one table, and it has 72,314,541 registers.

+--------+---------+--------+--------+------------+---------+
| tables | rows    | data   | idx    | total_size | idxfrac |
+--------+---------+--------+--------+------------+---------+
|      9 | 159.12M | 11.07G | 15.87G | 26.94G     |    1.43 |
+--------+---------+--------+--------+------------+---------+

For now we are making tests changing the values of the "innodb_buffer_pool_size", but looks like we are not going to get more performnace. Now, the question is, what can we do to have more performance on our MySQL?

-Put more RAM (obviously)
-Change more variables on /etc/my.cnf?
-MySQL Partitioning for Performance
-...

All the ideas and contributions will be welcome,

Thanks in advance

Edit: Added all the info of the table and the query

The structure of the DB is a system to receive information from some sensors and store it.

Measurement table: The measurements that we receive from the sensors.

+--------------------+------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| Field              | Type       | Null | Key | Default | Extra          |
+--------------------+------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| id                 | bigint(20) | NO   | PRI | NULL    | auto_increment |
| version            | bigint(20) | NO   |     | NULL    |                |
| counter            | char(2)    | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| datemeasurement_id | datetime   | NO   | MUL | NULL    |                |
| datereal_id        | datetime   | NO   | MUL | NULL    |                |
| delayed            | bit(1)     | NO   |     | NULL    |                |
| frequency          | tinyint(4) | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| measuringentity_id | bigint(20) | NO   | MUL | NULL    |                |
| real               | bit(1)     | NO   |     | NULL    |                |
| tamper             | bit(1)     | NO   |     | NULL    |                |
| value              | float      | NO   |     | NULL    |                |
+--------------------+------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+

measuring_entity table: One sensor can measure more than one thing (Temperature, Humidity). And these are the entitys.

+--------------+------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| Field        | Type       | Null | Key | Default | Extra          |
+--------------+------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| id           | bigint(20) | NO   | PRI | NULL    | auto_increment |
| version      | bigint(20) | NO   |     | NULL    |                |
| household_id | varchar(4) | NO   | MUL | NULL    |                |
| operative    | bit(1)     | NO   |     | NULL    |                |
| type         | char(20)   | NO   |     | NULL    |                |
| unit         | char(3)    | NO   |     | NULL    |                |
| interval     | float      | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
+--------------+------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+

sensor_measuring_entity: One sensor can have more than one entity associated.

+--------------------+------------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| Field              | Type       | Null | Key | Default | Extra |
+--------------------+------------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| sensor_id          | bigint(20) | NO   | PRI | NULL    |       |
| measuringentity_id | bigint(20) | NO   | PRI | NULL    |       |
| version            | bigint(20) | NO   |     | NULL    |       |
+--------------------+------------+------+-----+---------+-------+

Sensor table: The info of the sensor, related with the measuring entity in the previous table.

+---------------------+-------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| Field               | Type        | Null | Key | Default | Extra          |
+---------------------+-------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| id                  | bigint(20)  | NO   | PRI | NULL    | auto_increment |
| version             | bigint(20)  | NO   |     | NULL    |                |
| battery             | bit(1)      | NO   |     | NULL    |                |
| identifier          | char(6)     | NO   |     | NULL    |                |
| installationdate_id | datetime    | NO   | MUL | NULL    |                |
| lastreceiveddate_id | datetime    | YES  | MUL | NULL    |                |
| location_id         | bigint(20)  | NO   | MUL | NULL    |                |
| operative           | bit(1)      | NO   |     | NULL    |                |
| tampererror         | smallint(6) | NO   |     | NULL    |                |
+---------------------+-------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+

Location table: Where is placed the sensor.

+------------+------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| Field      | Type       | Null | Key | Default | Extra          |
+------------+------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| id         | bigint(20) | NO   | PRI | NULL    | auto_increment |
| version    | bigint(20) | NO   |     | NULL    |                |
| height     | tinyint(4) | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| operative  | bit(1)     | NO   |     | NULL    |                |
| place      | char(15)   | NO   | MUL | NULL    |                |
| room       | char(15)   | NO   |     | NULL    |                |
| typesensor | char(15)   | NO   |     | NULL    |                |
| formaster  | bit(1)     | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
+------------+------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+

This is the query (for all houses, and all sensors):

for (int z = 0; z < allHouses.length; z++) {
for (int j = 0; j < sensorlist.length; j++) {

sql.eachRow ("SELECT m.datemeasurement_id, s.identifier, me.type, m.value"
+ " FROM measurement as m"
+ " JOIN measuring_entity as me ON m.measuringentity_id = me.id"
+ " JOIN sensor_measuring_entity as sme ON sme.measuringentity_id = me.id"
+ " JOIN sensor as s ON sme.sensor_id = s.id"
+ " WHERE me.id = $actualmeid"
+ " AND me.household_id = '$mHouse'"
+ " AND m.datemeasurement_id >= '$cons_startDate'"
+ " AND m.datemeasurement_id <= '$cons_endDate'"
+ " AND m.datemeasurement_id > '$startDate'"
+ " AND m.datemeasurement_id < '$endDate'"
+ " ORDER BY datemeasurement_id")
{
}}

PD: everything is part of one Grails app.

share|improve this question
    
InnoDB will want to work with the tables in the buffer pool, but since it can't fit everything, it is probably going to need to hit the disk on every query, depending on the queries. Do you need to use InnoDB? MyISAM might be better depending on your app's use of the database. You might be able to reduce the size of that tables and indexes by optimizing data types and index use. If you post your table structure, I might be able to point out some optimizations. –  G-Nugget Nov 14 '12 at 15:47
    
First of all, thanks @G-Nugget for reply. I added more information about the query and the structure of the tables in the main question. The table is InnoDB because is saving tons of measurements every day. –  Marco Zimmerman Nov 14 '12 at 16:23
    
Judging by the numbers in your original post, all of the BIGINTs could probably be INTs or smaller for things like location_id. in Location, the CHARs could probably be VARCHARs, but that probably won't make a noticeable difference overall. If it isn't too difficult to change on the programming side, the DATETIME fields could be TIMESTAMPs, which saves 2 bytes/row per column changed. Changing BIGINTs to INTs saves 4 bytes/row per column changed, which would half the size of sensor_measuring_entity. If you can, make a copy of your tables and try these changes. –  G-Nugget Nov 14 '12 at 16:41

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