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It seems that helloworld.js gets loaded multiple times based on the number of times I click #load. I say this because when I look at Google Chromes Developer Tools Network tab, it shows helloworld.js as many times as I click #load.

$(document).ready(function() {

    $("#load").click(function(){
        $.getScript('helloworld.js', function() {
            hello();
        });
    });

});

The hello() function looks like this:

function hello(){
    alert("hello");
}

Is it possible to detect if helloworld.js has already loaded?

So if it hasn't loaded, load it, and if it has loaded, don't load it.

This is what Developer Tools currently shows me if I click the #load button 4 times:

enter image description here

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2  
You can also let it use cache: $.ajaxSetup({ cache: true }); (taken from here). –  Shadow Wizard Nov 14 '12 at 15:45
    
The calls should be cached already by the browser… –  feeela Nov 14 '12 at 15:49
    
@ShadowWizard, this seems to work, thanks. It should be an answer. –  oshirowanen Nov 14 '12 at 15:51
1  
@feeela by default jQuery will add unique timestamp to each AJAX call so that it won't get cached. By setting the property to false it won't add any unique value. –  Shadow Wizard Nov 14 '12 at 15:52
    
@oshirowanen cheers, done. –  Shadow Wizard Nov 14 '12 at 15:55
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Another option is letting .getScript() run but let it take the script from browser's cache so you won't have it reloaded each and every time.

To achieve this, add such code:

$.ajaxSetup({
    cache: true
});

This is taken from the documentation page.

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So why not only fire the event once like this:

$("#load").one("click", function() {
   $load = $(this);
   $.getScript('helloworld.js', function() {
       hello();
       // bind hello to the click event of load for subsequent calls
       $load.on('click', hello); 
   });
});

That would prevent subsequent loads and avoids the use of a global

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And to add, use $("#load").click(hello) after hello() to make subsequent clicks to #load call the hello method without re-loading the js. –  Kevin B Nov 14 '12 at 15:45
    
@Gabe, I need to run the hello() function many times, but need to load the helloworld.js only once. –  oshirowanen Nov 14 '12 at 15:52
    
@oshirowanen Right I just update the answer.... –  Gabe Nov 14 '12 at 15:53
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Set a flag when file loaded successfully. If flag is set then skip the file loading again.

Try this code,

    var isLoaded = 0; //Set the flag OFF 

    $(document).ready(function() {

        $("#load").click(function(){
            if(isLoaded){ //If flag is ON then return false
                alert("File already loaded");
                return false;
            }
            $.getScript('helloworld.js', function() {
                isLoaded = 1; //Turn ON the flag
                hello();

            });
        });

    });
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You could create a helper function:

var getScript = (function() {
  var loadedFiles = {};
  return function(filename, callback) {
    if(loadedFiles[filename]) {
      callback();
    } else {
      $.getScript(filename, function() {
        loadedFiles[filename] = true;
        callback();
      });
    }
  };
})();
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Implementing such a cache system is not that trivial. For instance, what if getScript is invoked multiple times for the same file name before the file in question is retrieved and executed? –  Šime Vidas Nov 14 '12 at 15:47
    
@Šime Vidas: Good point. On the other hand, that would only happen if you click multiple times very fast after each other, which may not be worth caring about. –  pimvdb Nov 14 '12 at 15:49
    
As both my parents regularly double-click on buttons, and links on web-pages, I think this scenario would occur more often than you think :P –  Šime Vidas Nov 14 '12 at 15:53
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