Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am interested if there is a UNIX tool which replaces occurences of $VAR or ${VAR} (for all existing variables in the env, not just one) with the actual values of environment variables. This replacment is in a plain text file, not a bash script; a "poor man's template engine" of sort.

I know I can do

(echo 'echo -n "'; sed -e "s/\"/\"'\"'\"/g" infile; echo '"') | sh -s >outfile

(I do, in fact), but if there is a well-known tool for that, I'd rather use it instead of clever sh tricks.

EDIT: @glennjackman suggest use of eval, so the line is shorter and without subshell:

eval echo -n \""`sed -e 's/"/\\\\\\\"/g' infile`"\" >outfile

which is pretty short (though not a dedicated tool, but good enough if there is none).

share|improve this question
    
I have not tried this (hence the comment), but with a simple script it should be possible to use bash -x infile 2> outfile, which will do all shell expansions. –  cdarke Nov 14 '12 at 19:23
    
What about eval? –  glenn jackman Nov 14 '12 at 19:35
    
@cdarke: I did not know bash -x, but I wonder if it would work in generic replacement in a text file, not in a bash script... –  herby Nov 14 '12 at 20:30
    
@glennjackman: eval may help me in fact with the trick above to ditch subsscript (thus, no need to export), thanks. But alone, it would try to evaluate the contents, which is not a script, but a normal text file. What I look for is "poor man's template engine". :-) –  herby Nov 14 '12 at 20:33
    
@glennjackman Maybe make your suggestion an answer, I will pick if nothing shorter appears. –  herby Nov 14 '12 at 20:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

An example with eval

tmpl='Hello $x'
x=world
eval str=\"$tmpl\"
echo $str   # => Hello world

If your template has embedded double quotes, this will get messy.

share|improve this answer
    
I already solved the embedded double quotes in the EDIT part, but it needed 7 backslashes :-) –  herby Nov 15 '12 at 12:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.