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Question: Is it possible to access a specific class from a header while hiding the other namespaces/classes defined in that header?

For example, say I have the header file -- outcome.hpp:

// outcome.hpp
namespace sports { namespace outcome {
  class Injury {};
  class Success {};
}}

In another header file -- api.hpp -- I wish to use sports::outcome::Injury without having sports::outcome::Success accessible to files that include api.hpp. Is that possible? If so, how can I achieve that?

P.S. In the actual code, api.hpp contains templated methods that would call methods of the Injury class so a forward declaration is not sufficient.


My attempts:

In my ignorance, I tried to achieve this by placing the include within an internal namespace. Here's a SSCCE:

// api.hpp
namespace sports { namespace api {
  namespace internal {
    #include "outcome.hpp"  // I'm trying to hide symbols within this header
    using sports::outcome::Injury;
  } 

  class Boxing {
    private:
      internal::Injury sustained;
  };
}

I celebrated prematurely when that worked:

// This cpp file compiles file   \o/
#include "api.hpp"
int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
  sports::api::Boxing b;  
  // sports::outcome not accessible
}

How it fails:

Things fall apart if a container from the standard library is used as a class member in outcome.hpp. For example, using this version:

// outcome.hpp
#include <vector>
namespace sports { namespace outcome {

  class Injury {
    private:
      std::vector x;
  };

// ...
}}

Compilation fails with the following errors:

In file included from /usr/include/c++/4.6/ext/new_allocator.h:34:0,
                 from /usr/include/c++/4.6/x86_64-linux-gnu/./bits/c++allocator.h:34,
                 from /usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/allocator.h:48,
                 from /usr/include/c++/4.6/vector:62,
                 from outcome.hpp:1,
                 from api.hpp:5,
                 from main.cpp:1:
/usr/include/c++/4.6/new:93:54: error: ‘void* sports::api::internal::operator new(sports::api::internal::std::size_t)’ may not be declared within a namespace
/usr/include/c++/4.6/new:94:56: error: ‘void* sports::api::internal::operator new [](sports::api::internal::std::size_t)’ may not be declared within a namespace
/usr/include/c++/4.6/new:95:35: error: ‘void sports::api::internal::operator delete(void*)’ may not be declared within a namespace
/usr/include/c++/4.6/new:96:37: error: ‘void sports::api::internal::operator delete [](void*)’ may not be declared within a namespace
/usr/include/c++/4.6/new:97:62: error: ‘void* sports::api::internal::operator new(sports::api::internal::std::size_t, const sports::api::internal::std::nothrow_t&)’ may not be declared within a namespace
/usr/include/c++/4.6/new:98:64: error: ‘void* sports::api::internal::operator new [](sports::api::internal::std::size_t, const sports::api::internal::std::nothrow_t&)’ may not be declared within a namespace
/usr/include/c++/4.6/new:99:58: error: ‘void sports::api::internal::operator delete(void*, const sports::api::internal::std::nothrow_t&)’ may not be declared within a namespace
/usr/include/c++/4.6/new:100:60: error: ‘void sports::api::internal::operator delete [](void*, const sports::api::internal::std::nothrow_t&)’ may not be declared within a namespace
/usr/include/c++/4.6/new:103:57: error: ‘void* sports::api::internal::operator new(sports::api::internal::std::size_t, void*)’ may not be declared within a namespace
/usr/include/c++/4.6/new:104:59: error: ‘void* sports::api::internal::operator new [](sports::api::internal::std::size_t, void*)’ may not be declared within a namespace
/usr/include/c++/4.6/new:107:52: error: ‘void sports::api::internal::operator delete(void*, void*)’ may not be declared within a namespace
/usr/include/c++/4.6/new:108:52: error: ‘void sports::api::internal::operator delete [](void*, void*)’ may not be declared within a namespace

I'm obviously doing this wrong. Advice and a good telling off would be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by "exposing the namespace"? –  juanchopanza Nov 14 '12 at 16:15
    
Using the example above, I don't want sports::outcome::* to be accessible in files that include api.hpp. –  Shawn Chin Nov 14 '12 at 16:18

2 Answers 2

You can import a name from a namespace into a different namespace with a using declaration.

namespace sports {
  using sports::outcome::Injury;
};

In your example a lot of things are wrong. Especially the include is ill placed and you are lacking include guards.

// file1.h
#ifndef FILE1_h
#define FILE1_h

namespace sports { namespace outcome {
  class Injury;
}}
#endif

// api.h   
#ifndef API_H
#define API_H

#include <file1.h>

namespace sports {
  using sports::outcome::injury;
}

#endif

A file that includes api.h has now access to:

sports::injury x;

A file that just includes file1.h only has access to:

sports::outcome::injury x;
share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't I need to first include the header file that defines Injury, and would that not include everything within that header file? Pardon my ignorance, I'm still getting to terms with C++. –  Shawn Chin Nov 14 '12 at 16:22
    
@ShawnChin Yes, you need to. I added an example. There is no way around including everything in that header. Try to separate your headers, have forward declarations, etc. –  pmr Nov 14 '12 at 16:23
    
I left out include guards for the sake of brevity (they're there in the actual code). The ill-placed include was a lame attempt that hiding what's being included -- it certainly felt wrong, but I couldn't see how else to achieve that, hence the question. –  Shawn Chin Nov 14 '12 at 16:25
    
@ShawnChin You cannot do that simply on the way the C++ include system works. It unfortunately has zero encapsulation. –  pmr Nov 14 '12 at 16:26
    
That makes sense. Thanks for you patience. –  Shawn Chin Nov 14 '12 at 16:30

If I understand your intend correctly you want something like a 'private' or 'internal' namespace then? IMHO that's not possible in C++.

You might use a class to do this and place internal class definitions as nested classes there, your api namespace could be realized similarly exposing the other classes as public typedefs, provided that api is a friend of the internal class.

namespace sports
{
    class api;

    class outcome
    {
        friend class api;

        // Internal class definitions
        class Boxing
        {
        };
    };

    class api
    {
    public:
        typedef outcome::Boxing Boxing;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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