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When using a switch statement, with an exhaustive list of available items (for example an enum), and in the event that each item has its own conditional code, should I use the default label? For example:

public class MyClass {

    public enum Type {
        TYPE1, TYPE2
    }

    private Type type;

    public void withDefault() {
        switch (type) {
        case TYPE1:
            // some conditional code for TYPE1
            break;
        default:
            // some conditional code for TYPE2
            break;
        }
    }

    public void withoutDefault() {
        switch (type) {
        case TYPE1:
            // some conditional code for TYPE1
            break;
        case TYPE2:
            // some conditional code for TYPE2
            break;
        }
    }

}

In that case, what should I use: the withDefault() method or the withoutDefault() one? Or maybe is it only a matter of taste?

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I think it is matter of requirement. How your application need to behave on none of the conditions satisfied. –  Nambari Nov 14 '12 at 16:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I usually use a case for each TYPE1 and TYPE2 and then a default that throws an exception, so that later when a type is added the exception will remind me to change the switch.

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1  
If you have a case for TYPE1 and TYPE2 without the default and you add a new type then if you're using an IDE like Eclipse it will warn you that you're missing the case label at compile time - which is arguably much better than at runtime. Obviously this assumes you don't ignore warnings. –  pauli Nov 14 '12 at 16:50
1  
@pauli Faster and even more obvious if you set that warning to be a error. –  Jonathan Drapeau Nov 14 '12 at 17:15

This is handy for future proofing. When you have an exhaustive list have the default throw an IllegalStateException or similar to indicate that that something has changed in the system

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I think it depends on your preferences. For example I can imagine a situation when you think that there will be no new entries in your enum and someone adds it behind your back and this breaks your code. So in this case it may be preferable to have an Exception thrown in the default case:

        switch (type) {
        case TYPE1:
            // some conditional code for TYPE1
            break;
        case TYPE2:
            // some conditional code for TYPE2
            break;
            // ...
        default:
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("This type is not yet supported.");
        }

An even better approach could be using the Command Pattern instead of a big switch block. Using an ever increasing switch block can clutter your code and make it more difficult to maintain.

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Its depends on you requirement. In withDefault(), any type other than TYPE1 goes in the second section i.e.default but that is not the case in withoutDefault(), which is more exclusive.

I prefer a little different version of withoutDefault() *with added default to throw some exception), because it supports only pre-determined enums and any change in enum will be brought to your attention.

If you think that anything other than Type1 should always go to default then withDefault() is better.

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