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I have found a macro that highlights duplicates

Public Sub MarkDuplicates()
    Dim iWarnColor As Integer
    Dim rng As Range
    Dim rngCell As Variant


    Set rng = Range("A1:A65000")
    iWarnColor = xlThemeColorAccent2

    For Each rngCell In rng.Cells
        vVal = rngCell.Text
        If (WorksheetFunction.CountIf(rng, vVal) = 1) Then
            rngCell.Interior.Pattern = xlNone
        Else
            rngCell.Interior.ColorIndex = iWarnColor
        End If
    Next
End Sub

But I need it to highlight all the duplicates except for the first instance. Perhaps a better way is to highlight the first instance of a unique value instead?

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Just change the range tested against to be from rngCell to the top of the column –  lc. Nov 14 '12 at 16:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Check the range above the current cell to see if the count is greater than 1, rather than checking the whole range.

This modification will run also only test rows with data, and not run though 65535 cells if it's not actually filled with anything

Option Explicit

Public Sub MarkDuplicates()
Dim iWarnColor As Integer
Dim rng As Range
Dim rngCell As Variant
Dim LR As Long
Dim vVal

LR = Cells(Rows.Count, "A").End(xlUp).Row

Set rng = Range("A1:A" & LR)
iWarnColor = xlThemeColorAccent2

For Each rngCell In rng.Cells
    vVal = rngCell.Text
    If (WorksheetFunction.CountIf(Range("A2:A" & rngCell.Row), vVal) = 1) Then
        rngCell.Interior.Pattern = xlNone
    Else
        rngCell.Interior.ColorIndex = iWarnColor
    End If
Next
End Sub
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2  
It's nice, but can you think of how to avoid doing a for each loop? I couldn't which is why I listed a conditional formatting option. –  Daniel Cook Nov 14 '12 at 20:23
    
@DanielCook, I would use conditional formatting in the same way that you have in your answer, but the question was tagged vba, and keeg already had code. –  Sean Cheshire Nov 14 '12 at 20:30

Just because, here's a conditional format option that works the same as Sean Cheshire's code:

=COUNTIF(INDIRECT("$A$1:A" & ROW()),INDIRECT("A"&ROW()))>1

EDIT:

Here is an improved form of the Conditional Format Method that is Column independant:

=COUNTIF(INDIRECT("R1C"&COLUMN()&":R"&ROW()&"C"&COLUMN(),FALSE),INDIRECT("R"&ROW()&"C"&COLUMN(),FALSE))>1

EDIT 2:

If you really want to use code the following will apply the 2nd Conditional format to all selected cells, turning matching cells font Red. This could easily be modified to use any range instead of selection.

Dim conditionalFormula As String
conditionalFormula = "=COUNTIF(INDIRECT(""R1C""&COLUMN()&"":R""&ROW()&""C""&COLUMN(),FALSE),INDIRECT(""R""&ROW()&""C""&COLUMN(),FALSE))>1"
With Selection.FormatConditions.Add(xlExpression, , conditionalFormula)
    .Font.ColorIndex = 3
End With
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1  
+1 much better than looping. –  brettdj Nov 15 '12 at 6:22

quick fix:

define counter

Dim cnt As Integer

set it to 1

cnt = 1

add one for every loopstep

cnt = cnt + 1

and add statement to skip loop statement if cnt equals 1

if( cnt==1 ) then continue for

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