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  1. Is it free? It looks like on the website it says "Try Now", which makes me worry that it just gives you a demo.

  2. Do you have to pay the Qt company anything to distribute a program using Qt, or can you just throw it (the program) out there and just say you used Qt.

  3. Is it native C++, or something weird, like, the same way .NET programs aren't actual C++, they just look like it.

  4. Would somebody who uses my program have to install the Qt framework before they can run it, or will the program run without any installation?

  5. Can it easily be compiled to work on a Windows, Linux and Mac OS?

P.S.: Pretty sure this question relates to: "software tools commonly used by programmers", I don't see why there are all the dislikes and having the question closed. (Tough crowd)

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closed as off topic by Don Roby, Mat, Tony The Lion, cmannett85, Arnold Spence Nov 14 '12 at 17:09

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Please, one question per question, and stick to actual practical programming questions. Qt's documentation is quite good, including the docs about compiling, deployment on various platforms. –  Mat Nov 14 '12 at 16:53
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@Mat - I think these are linked partsof the same question. Yes you can find the answers to all these online - but these answers may be out of date. Qt has been through 3 owners and different licenses in the last few years –  Martin Beckett Nov 14 '12 at 16:59
    
1 and 2 can be discovered by reading the website. 3: yes, it's standard C++, though it ships a custom code preprocessor that you need to integrate into your build process. 4: you can just ship the library yourself. 5: Yes. –  Kerrek SB Nov 14 '12 at 16:59
    
@MartinBeckett: answers here will also get outdated. The official website is the place to go for licensing information, regardless of who owns the stuff today. –  Mat Nov 14 '12 at 17:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Is it free? It looks like on the website it says "Try Now", which makes me worry that it just gives you a demo.

It's LGPL so free-speech and free-beer. You have to release any changes to Qt itself but you can use it for free in your commercial apps. You can buy a commercial license which gives you better support and the right to keep any modifications or additions to the library to yourself.

Is it native c++, or something weird, like, the same way .NET programs aren't actual c++, they just look like it.

It is c++, there is an extra pre-compile step which generates native C++ code for the GUI and for some special features (signal/slots). For historic reasons it contains its own version of lots of c++ that is now standard (eg. its own equivalent of STL and it's own threading) but you are free to mix STL/boost/Qt types as you wish. It works with any regular c++ compiler.

Would somebody who uses my program have to install the QT framework before they can run it, or will the program run without any installation?

You need to include the Qt shared libraries (dll/so) that you use, along with your apps. On linux you can use the system Qt libs, on windows it's trickier to mix dlls across compilers.

Can it easily be compiled to work on a Windows, Linux and Mac OS?

It's easy to build, configure --a list of options for stuff you want or you can download compiled binaries for all platforms.

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Actually qt.digia.com (which is top in Google for qt) offers only commercial version. LGPL licensed version can be found on qt-project.org –  Lol4t0 Nov 14 '12 at 17:06
    
thanks alot, answered all my questions perfectly! –  Forgive Goto Nov 14 '12 at 17:55
    
also thank you for your response to mats criticism, people on this website are SO touchy about what you say/ask. –  Forgive Goto Nov 14 '12 at 20:42

(It's spelled "Qt", not "QT", btw.)

  1. You went to the wrong website. Instead, go to the Qt Project website. Qt is free and open source (LGPL and GPL). The commercial license, as offered by Digia, is optional.

  2. You don't need to pay anything if you don't buy a commercial license. When you distribute your program, you need to comply with the terms of either the GPL or the LGPL, according to which of those two licenses you pick.

  3. It's native C++, except for the QML module, which uses a JavaScript engine. The QML module is optional; you can stick to C++ if you want.

  4. If you link statically against Qt, then no. If you don't, you need to include the Qt DLLs with your application.

  5. I do all three, and it was easy. Actually, to create Windows versions of my application, I cross compile them in Linux using MXE.

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  1. It's dual-licensed. You can do almost anything you want if you're producing FOSS. If you produce closed-source commercial software, you can use it for free if its in a DLL/.so, but have to pay if you statically link it into your application.
  2. See above. Depends on how you link to it.
  3. It's native C++ that runs without any virtual machine or anything like that. It does use a "Meta Object Compiler" (MOC) to produce part of the code, so to do some things, you write something in another language, which MOC translates to C++, and compile that.
  4. If you link it statically, it will just be in your executable. If you link dynamically, it'll be in a DLL/.so, but I believe you can install that as part of your program (i.e., it'll be in a separate file, but the user doesn't have to install it separately).
  5. Yes, reasonably easily anyway.
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