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I'm using a basic 3-tier design. For flexibility (and testing) purposes, I wanted the data layer to be abstract and specify the concrete class in my code. But, how should I pass this along to my business objects. Here's an example (pseudo code):

abstract class IDataLayer
{
    PersonData GetPerson(int); //PersonData would be a row of data from a table for example
    JobData[] GetJobs(int);
    void UpdatePerson(PersonData);
}

class ConcreteDataLayerSQL : IDataLayer
{
...
}
class ConcreteDataLayerXML : IDataLayer
{
...
}

class PersonBAL
{
    void PersonBAL(personId)
    {
        //What goes here?
    }

    JobBAL[] GetJobs()
    {
       //What goes here?
    }
}
class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        person = new PersonBAL(1);
    }
}

So the problem is, how does PersonBAL know which ConcreteDataLayer to use? I'm thinking between a few options:

1: pass the concrete data layer to person. This becomes a pain when you start adding new classes that need to interact with the data layer (something like new PersonBAL(IDataLayer, int), then new JobBAL(IDataLayer, int), etc etc)

2: Create a static object that holds which data layer to use (Read: global variable)

Any other ideas?

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3 Answers

The problem you're trying to solve is "dependency injection".

Assuming that this is .NET code (your psuedo-code language looks a lot like C#), you might want to look into a framework like Spring.NET that is designed for this kind of thing.

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While I appreciate the clarification on the term, I'd like a better solution than to get a framework to handle the problem. How does the framework handle the problem? –  Jon Aug 27 '09 at 1:13
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I think passing the class in each constructor would be challenging for the reason you listed and because changing the code to use a different class would be an error-prone chore.

Dependency Injection is at the core of the Spring framework. Spring uses XML configuration files to describe the relationships between classes. For your use case, you can specify the specific type you want to instantiate in the configuration, so you only have to make one change to switch implementations.

Spring is a well-known and tested framework, but of course you don't need it to resolve the problem. You could very well write you own code for configuration files. Either way, this is essentially a variation on the second option you mentioned.

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you could put a layer of indirection in your code so that you never directly constructed a PersonBAL instead you have a PersonBALFactory which you use to construct your PersonBAL instances. The factory has the dependency on the IDataLayer which is passed in through the constructor (and that is wired up at your application start up time) and you tell the factory to create person using a PersonId and it the creates a new PersonBAL passing the ID and the IDataLayer. That way the user doesn't need to be concerned with which IDataLayer you are using, it is set up in the applications configuration at startup time, the user just requests new PersonBAL using the information they know.

DI frameworks will help you configure all of the dependency injection so that the correct types are passed into the constructors and will make the configuration of the factories (and things which have a dependency on the factories) automatic and simpler once you have a lot of factories or complex dependency graphs.

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