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I'm playing with functor composition, where the return type of a functor depends on the input type:

template<typename V>
class F
{
protected:
    V v_;
public:
    using return_type = ?;

    F(V v) : v_(v) {}

    template<typename T>
    typename T::U operator()(T t)
    {
        v.method(t);
    }
};

...

X x;
Y y;
F<X> f(x);
F<Y> g(y);
auto h = std::bind(f, std::bind(g, _1));
h(...);  // problem is here :(

Is it possible to find return_type using decltype so that std::bind will work? If so, how?

Edit: I replace U<T> with typename T::U because the return type depends on the type. I hope this is clearer now.

Edit 2 (4?): Added a compilable example that reproduces the problem.

#include <functional>

using namespace std::placeholders;

template<typename I>
struct R
{
    using IT = I;
    R(I x, I y) : b(x), e(y) {}
    I b;
    I e;
};

template<typename IN, typename II>
class CI
{
    CI(II i) {}
};

template<typename IN>
class C
{
    template<typename IR>
    R<CI<IN, typename IR::IT> >
    operator()(IR& i)
    {
        return R<CI<IN, typename IR::IT> >(
            CI<IN, typename IR::IT>(i.b),
            CI<IN, typename IR::IT>(i.e));
    }
};

struct F {};
struct G {};
struct H {};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    C<F> a;
    C<G> b;
    auto c = std::bind(a, std::bind(b, _1));
    R<H> r{H{}, H{}};
    c(r);
}
share|improve this question
    
You use, but do not define, U. Is that a typo? –  Robᵩ Nov 14 '12 at 17:20
    
Doesn't bind use result_of, and hence decltype, anyway and so you don't even need return_type? –  Kerrek SB Nov 14 '12 at 17:23
    
U<T> was just an example of a return type that depended on the input type. I replaced it with typename T::U to make it clearer. –  bruno nery Nov 14 '12 at 17:23
    
So you have an arbitrary number of input types, giving rise to an arbitrary number of output types, and you want to typedef a single output type? I don't think it can work like this. Either require your T::Us be convertible to some common type, or parameterize the whole functor on T. –  Useless Nov 14 '12 at 17:24
    
Originally, the whole functor was parametrized on T - but that would make it impossible to create a generic functor. The requirement of T::U be convertible to some common type might work, though. –  bruno nery Nov 14 '12 at 17:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Forget about using std::bind for a minute and just try the direct approach:

C<F> a;
C<G> b;
R<H> r{H{}, H{}};
a(b(r));

This won't even compile, so there's no way the bind version will!

b(r) isn't valid because of an access violation, and if you fix that a(b(r)) fails because you try to bind a temporary to a non-const lvalue-reference

share|improve this answer
    
Correct! Thanks for showing me how to "fish" for future mistakes :) –  bruno nery Nov 14 '12 at 19:56

Solved it! I had to replace C::operator()(IR& i) with C::operator()(IR i) because it was recursive. Maybe adding a move constructor to IR would help performance, but...? In fact, what happened was that clang's errors weren't as helpful as gcc's. Well, blame me.

share|improve this answer

Your example can be solved using alternative function syntax:

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>

template<typename T>
struct Number {
  T t_;
  Number(T t) : t_(t) {}
  T operator+(T t) { return t_ + t; }
};

struct F {
  template<typename T>
  auto operator()(T x) -> decltype(x + 1)
  {
    return x + 1;
  }
} f, g;

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  using namespace std::placeholders;
  auto h = std::bind(f, std::bind(g, _1));
  std::cout << h(Number<int>(1)) << std::endl;
}

and value_type is not needed here and it fact it provided problems as int returned from g(_1) will never have int::value_type inside expected by f.

share|improve this answer
    
@bruno nery Ohh, it seems you removed your concrete example :-( I hope my answer still helps... –  Mateusz Pusz Nov 14 '12 at 18:20
    
I tried replacing my return type with auto, @Mateusz Pusz, but it didn't help. I'll try to find a contained concrete example :(. –  bruno nery Nov 14 '12 at 18:30
    
Added a real concrete example, @Mateusz Pusz. Can you crack that one? :) –  bruno nery Nov 14 '12 at 18:49

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