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I am running some thread safe code here. I am using a mutex to protect the section of code that needs to be run only by only 1 thread at a time. The problem I have is using this code sometimes I end up with 2 Mutex objects. This is a static function by the way. How do I make sure only 1 mutex object gets created??

/*static*/ MyClass::GetResource()
{

if (m_mutex == 0)
{
// make a new mutex object
m_mutex = new MyMutex();
}

m_mutex->Lock();
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2  
What platform? Why not use a "real" system-level mutex? Those typically allow naming which will ensure uniqueness. –  DarkSquid Aug 27 '09 at 1:29
    
MyMutex is a pthread_mutex_t –  shergill Aug 27 '09 at 1:30
    
Named mutexes are obnoxious. The language already offers a namespace; why create a new one for synchronization? –  Andres Jaan Tack Aug 27 '09 at 1:50
    
@Andres: Because the language namescope often is the wrong one? E.g. the C++ namescope is at best as big as the running process. The namespace for named mutexes often is a systemwide namespace. –  MSalters Aug 27 '09 at 9:54
    
@MSalters In principle, I agree, but I think you're overstating the benefits. system-wide namespace is only valuable if you want multiple processes sharing the same primitive. The vast majority of synchronization problems, though, are defined within one process. Why open the problem to the kernel and other processes if you don't need to? Thoughts? –  Andres Jaan Tack Aug 27 '09 at 16:21

5 Answers 5

Simply create m_mutex outside of GetResource(), before it can ever be called - this removes the critical section around the actual creation of the mutex.

MyClass::Init()
{
  m_mutex = new Mutex;
}    

MyClass::GetResource()
{
  m_mutex->Lock();
  ...
  m_mutex->Unlock();
}
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3  
+1. Trying to do lazy mutex creation will lead to a world of hurt. –  Logan Capaldo Aug 27 '09 at 1:34
    
MyClass::GetResource is a static function :( –  shergill Aug 27 '09 at 3:20
    
@shergill So is MyClass::Init, in this example. The point is to make sure Init() is called before any calls to GetResource. –  Andres Jaan Tack Aug 27 '09 at 4:20
    
@shergill - unless GetResource() is being called before main(), in which case you have much bigger issues, it should be easy to find a place for Init() to be called. –  Justicle Aug 27 '09 at 4:48

The issue is the thread could be interrupted after checking if m_mutex is 0, but not before it creates the mutex, allowing another thread to run through the same code.

Don't assign to m_mutex right away. Create a new mutex, and then do an atomic compare exchange.

You don't mention your target platform, but on Windows:

MyClass::GetResource()
{
    if (m_mutex == 0)
    {
        // make a new mutex object
        MyMutex* mutex = new MyMutex();

        // Only set if mutex is still NULL.
        if (InterlockedCompareExchangePointer(&m_mutex, mutex, 0) != 0)
        {
           // someone else beat us to it.
           delete mutex;
        }
    }
    m_mutex->Lock();

Otherwise, replace with whatever compare/swap function your platform provides.

Another option is to use one-time initialization support, which is available on Windows Vista and up, or just pre-create the mutex if you can.

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example please? –  shergill Aug 27 '09 at 1:28
    
Your current example has a memory leak - you need to ensure to delete the mutex instance that lost the race –  1800 INFORMATION Aug 27 '09 at 1:33
    
@1800 - Thanks for pointing that out, it'd be awful if someone copied the code as is. Fixed. –  Michael Aug 27 '09 at 1:38

Lazy mutex initialization isn't really appropriate for static methods; you need some guarantee that nobody races to the initialization. The following uses the compiler to generate a single static mutex for the class.

/* Header (.hxx) */
class MyClass
{
    ...

  private:
    static mutable MyMutex m_mutex;  // Declares, "this mutex exists, somewhere."
};


/* Compilation Unit (.cxx) */
MyMutex MyClass::m_mutex;            // The aforementioned, "somewhere."

MyClass::GetResource()
{
    m_mutex.Lock();
    ...
    m_mutex.Unlock();
}

Some other solutions will require extra assumptions of your fellow programmers. With the "call init()" method, for instance, you have to be sure that the initialization method were called, and everybody would have to know this rule.

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Why use a pointer anyway? Why not replace the pointer with an actual instance that does not require dynamic memory management? This avoids the race condition, and does not impose a performance hit on every call into the function.

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Since it is only to protect one specific section of code, simply declare it static inside the function.

static MyClass::GetResource()
{
    static MyMutex mutex;

    mutex.Lock();
    // ...
    mutex.Unlock();

The variable is a local variable with static storage duration. It is explicitly stated in the Standard:

An implementation is permitted to perform early initialization of other block-scope variables with static or thread storage duration under the same conditions that an implementation is permitted to statically initialize a variable with static or thread storage duration in namespace scope (3.6.2). Otherwise such a variable is initialized the first time control passes through its declaration; such a variable is considered initialized upon the completion of its initialization. If the initialization exits by throwing an exception, the initialization is not complete, so it will be tried again the next time control enters the declaration. If control enters the declaration concurrently while the variable is being initialized, the concurrent execution shall wait for completion of the initialization.

The last sentence is of particular interest to you.

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