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I need to read from an input file by using C programming language to do one of my assignments.

Here's my code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    char *input = readFromFile(argv);
    return 0;
}

char *readFromFile(char *argv[])
{
    FILE *fp;
    fp = fopen(argv[1],"r");
    char *input, c;
    int i = 0;

    while(!feof(fp))
    {
        c = fgetc(fp);
        input[i++] = c;
    }
    fclose(fp);
    return input;
}

I want to do this reading operation in another function, not in function main(). I tried, but couldn't do it.

When I try to do it with the code above, I get an error message that says:

conflicting types for readFromFile()

How can I fix this error and do what I want?

share|improve this question
    
You're dereferencing an uninitialized pointer (input)... This will crash. –  user529758 Nov 14 '12 at 17:47
    
feof() is plain wrong. Make sure you understand this. Don't put "C" on your CV until you do. –  Kerrek SB Nov 14 '12 at 17:48
    
1  
Wood behind the mandate-arrow that in-flux with teaching the language, academia should be required to teach debugging techniques. This code never checks the result of fopen(), uses feof() incorrectly, writes through an uninitialized pointer into random memory, performs no boundary checking during reading, and utilizes assumed function-decl because there is no prototype before usage of readFromFile() in main(). –  WhozCraig Nov 14 '12 at 17:54
    
When I tried reading from the text file with the same code in main() function, it worked. So, I thought there were no mistakes in my code in readFromFile() function. I'm gonna consider your answers, read and try to understand what you said about feof() function. Thank you... –  mikrobik Nov 14 '12 at 18:05

2 Answers 2

First of all you can choose between these:

1. Declare the function prototype;
2. Declare the function before the main.

This way the function is recognized in main.To be fast I always declare function before the main.In readFromFile you aren't allocating the memory that you need, fixed it for you:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

char *readFromFile(char *argv[])
{
    FILE *fp;
    fp = fopen(argv[1],"r");
    char *input, c;
    int i = 0;
    size_t size=100*sizeof(char);
    input=(char*)malloc(size);

    while( (c = fgetc(fp)) != EOF )
    {
        if(++i == size)
        {
            size+= 100*sizeof(char);
            input=(char*)realloc(input,size);
        }
        input[i-1] = c;
    }
    fclose(fp);
    return input;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    char *input = readFromFile(argv);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
It worked. Thank you very much... –  mikrobik Nov 14 '12 at 18:14
    
Your reallocation strategy is not very efficient (BTW sizeof(char) and malloc cast are useless). –  md5 Nov 14 '12 at 18:18
    
@Kirilenko My reallocation strategy is efficient speaking about CPU.You should know that realloc takes a lot of CPU, so instead of reallocating at every character, I allocate blocks of 100 Bytes.100 B are nothing in modern RAMs. About the cast, this is to silent the compiler warning, and sizeof(char) is because a char is not 1B on every machine.You should know this, every book taches this. –  Ramy Al Zuhouri Nov 14 '12 at 20:47
    
@RamyAlZuhouri: You are wrong. 1) An efficient reallocation should use geometric progression. (check here: bourguet.org/v2/cs/realloc). 2) The cast is useless in C, and it doesn't report any warning. You are maybe compiling with a C++ compiler. 3) sizeof(char) is always 1. Not always 8 bits, however (rather CHAR_BIT). Buy an other book. ;-) –  md5 Nov 15 '12 at 16:06
    
The reallocation strategy depends on what you have to the file, you can't say that the geometric progression is the best strategy.If you have blocks of 100 B on your file then that's the best strategy and btw I can't reach your french file. However you were returning a memory allocated on the stack from a function, risking to overflow the buffer and having syntax error, then contest these details like casts (my compiler gives me a warning, then?) and efficiency.I think that this is simply ridicolous. –  Ramy Al Zuhouri Nov 15 '12 at 19:42

You have to declare readFromFile before using it. The best way to do this is to add a prototype:

char *readFromFile(char *argv[]); /* note that the identifier is useless here */

NB: By the way, there is a lot of other errors in your source code. The main one is that you don't allocate memory for input. Therefore, you will try to dereference an unitialized pointer: this leads to an undefined behavior. Since you are returning your pointer, you need to use dynamic allocation.

#include <stdlib.h>
char *input = malloc(SIZE);

Moreover, your utilisation of feof is wrong.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried, it didn't work. :/ –  mikrobik Nov 14 '12 at 17:47
1  
There will be a lot of runtime error. However, when I add a prototype before main function, I personnally don't have compile error anymore. –  md5 Nov 14 '12 at 17:49
    
Did you put the prototype above the main function? –  prprcupofcoffee Nov 14 '12 at 17:50
    
When I declare it like you do and try to run the program, it stops working immediately. –  mikrobik Nov 14 '12 at 17:51
    
So, there is no compilation error anymore. See my edit (and also the comments). –  md5 Nov 14 '12 at 17:52

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