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I am using C++.

in .h:

static CRITICAL_SECTION g_CS;

in .cpp:

CRITICAL_SECTION CQCommon::g_CS;

but I want to use

QGUID temp;
EnterCriticalSection(&g_CS);
temp = g_GUID++;
LeaveCriticalSection(&g_CS);
return temp;

in one static function. How can I invoke InitializeCriticalSection(PCRITICAL_SECTION pcs);?

Can I using the following one:

QGUID func(XXX)
{
    static {
    InitializeCriticalSection(&g_CS);
    }
                    QGUID temp;
                    EnterCriticalSection(&g_CS);
                    temp = g_GUID++;
                    LeaveCriticalSection(&g_CS);
                    return temp;
}

And how can I invoke DeleteCriticalSection(&g_CS) after app leave?

Using MFC, it seems CCriticalSection is a solution.

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Putting the g_CS variable declaration in the header file defeats the purpose of making it static (unless it is a static class member) –  Adrian Panasiuk Aug 27 '09 at 2:04
    
I am sorry I don't understand, can you give me a sample in my question? I always declare static member in this way, It seems work –  user25749 Aug 27 '09 at 2:21
    
Variables deserve to be declared as static, when they are supposed to be accessed from only one compilation unit; you put a variable declaration in a header file for the opposite reason: when you want to use it in more than one compilation unit. Also, putting a declaration into a header file without the extern specifier would result in duplicate definitions during linkage as soon as two compilation units include that header. –  Adrian Panasiuk Aug 27 '09 at 2:28
    
..of course.. g_CS isn't a class member, right? The above explanation is irrelevant to static class members –  Adrian Panasiuk Aug 27 '09 at 2:32
    
g_CS is a static member of class CQCommon –  user25749 Aug 27 '09 at 4:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

If you want a different approach you can create an object to manage it:

class CriticalSectionManager
{
  public:
  CriticalSectionManager()
  {
    InitializeCriticalSection(&g_CS);
  }
  ~CriticalSectionManager()
  {
     DeleteCriticalSection(&g_CS);
  }
};

void Func(void)
{
  static CriticalSectionManager man;
  //Do stuff
}

This will now be managed automatically by C++. The critical section will be initialized when the function is first entered, and deleted when the program exits.

Furthermore you can extend this by having the actual PCRITICAL_SECTION variable inside the class, etc.. etc..

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4  
This code is broken. The C++ standard says nothing about the thread safety of the initialization of a static variable inside a function and you might wind up initializing man twice if two threads execute Func simultaneously. –  Michael Aug 27 '09 at 22:00

In the entry point to your code - the main function, call the init:

int main(...)
{
  InitializeCriticalSection(&g_CS);

  // do some stuff

  DeleteCriticalSection(&g_CS);

  // exit
  return 0;
}
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This is the best way to do it - InitializeCriticalSection is very cheap to call. –  Michael Aug 27 '09 at 1:42

Well, today the best practice is to use "scoped lock" pattern instead of EnterXXX and LeaveXX -like functions. Take a look at what boos has to offer. Regardless, an RAII approach can help you here:

class MyCriticalSection
{
private: 
    CRITICAL_SECTION m_CS;
public:
    MyCriticalSection()
   {
     ::InitializeCriticalSection(&m_CS);
    }
   ~MyCriticalSection()
   {
     ::DeleteCriticalSection(&m_CS);
   }
   void Lock()
   {
     ::EnterCriticalSection(&m_CS);
   }
   void UnLock()
   {
     ::LeaveCriticalSetion(&m_CS);
   }
}
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