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I have what should be a simple quicksort implementation, but it's returning a recursion depth exceeded error, and I'm testing it on a list of less than 30 elements. Moreover, my implementation was working on a list of 10,000 a few days ago, and the only thing I changed was moving it from a Class to a global function. Anyone see what may be causing this?

def quickSort(m, left, right):
    if len(m[left:right]) <= 1:
        return m
    pivot = m[left]
    i = left + 1
    j = left + 1
    for j in range(j, right):
        if m[j] <= pivot:
            m[j], m[i] = m[i], m[j]
            i += 1
    m[left], m[i-1] = m[i-1], m[left]
    m = quickSort(m, left, i)
    m = quickSort(m, i, right)
    return m
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2  
for j in range(j, right): that can't be good (for readability for the very least) –  amit Nov 14 '12 at 17:59
    
Add some print statements and re-run to see how it progress. –  Wai Yip Tung Nov 14 '12 at 18:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

one of your recursive calls is causing the exception(as you may have guessed :-), also note that you sort the list in place so returning the list is not necessary

def quickSort(m, left, right):
    if right - left  <= 1:
        return

    pivot = m[left]
    i = left + 1 
    j = left + 1 
    for j in range(j, right):
        if m[j] <= pivot:
            m[j], m[i] = m[i], m[j]
            i += 1
    m[left], m[i-1] = m[i-1], m[left]
    quickSort(m, left, i-1)
    quickSort(m, i, right)
share|improve this answer
    
Yup, the pivot should be excluded when sorting the sub-list. Good one, I missed it :) –  Asiri Rathnayake Nov 14 '12 at 19:48

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