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This is just a basic programming question regarding conditional if. Let say I have something like this:

if(a == 1 || a == 2 || a == 3)
{
   var $myvar = 10;
   // do stuff if the value of a is either 1, 2 or 3
}

if(a == 1)
{
   var total = $myvar + 1;
   // do stuff if the value of a is 1
}

if(a == 2 || a == 3)
{
   var total = $myvar + 1;
   // do stuff if the value of a is either 2 or 3
}

It's pretty clear what I'm trying to do in the code above. As you can see, we have some common conditions in here (for example, a == 1 is common in 2 of the 3 conditions). Also, please notice that I have a variable $myvar that I want to be declared ONLY if a == 1 || a == 2 || a == 3 and access it in my other two conditions. Can anybody think of another (possibly cleaner) way of doing this?

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6  
you tagged php, java, javascript, c++, please take time to ask a question, and make a real title –  Ibu Nov 14 '12 at 18:15
    
use an object to hide it? –  Marc B Nov 14 '12 at 18:15
    
Nest the conditionals. –  Max Nov 14 '12 at 18:15
    
Use a switch statement on a. –  Blaise Swanwick Nov 14 '12 at 18:16
1  
user765368, do you favor any particular one of the four languages you tagged this question with? –  Michael Petrotta Nov 14 '12 at 18:22
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6 Answers

if(a == 1 || a == 2 || a == 3)
{
   var $myvar = 10;
   // do stuff if the value of a is either 1, 2 or 3
  if(a == 1)
  {
     var total = $myvar + 1;
     // do stuff if the value of a is 1
  }
  else
  {
     var total = $myvar + 1;
     // do stuff if the value of a is either 2 or 3
  }

}

or better yet

if(a == 1 || a == 2 || a == 3)
{
   var $myvar = 10;
   // do stuff if the value of a is either 1, 2 or 3
   var total = $myvar + 1;

  if(a == 1)
  {
     // do stuff if the value of a is 1
  }
  else
  {
     // do stuff if the value of a is either 2 or 3
  }

}

The difference between the two is slight and you might use the first if it makes the code clearer -- also some languages will change the scope of a variable depending on where it is declared so that might impact which you use.

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Without knowing the specific requirements, There really isn't too terribly much for you to do to improve that.

depending on your requirements:

You can try the switch statement

switch(a)
{
    case 1:
    case 2:
    case 3:
        //logic for if a is 1, 2, or 3
    break;
    default:
        //if a is something else
    break;
}

and

if(a == 2 || a == 3)

can be changed to

else if(a == 2 || a == 3)

but that's mostly cosmetic, and has a minimal effect on runtime.

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If this is JavaScript, you're going to anger the devout followers of Crockford with those fall-throughs. ;) –  Matthew Blancarte Nov 14 '12 at 18:18
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You could try something like the following:

if(a == 1 || a == 2 || a == 3)
{
   var $myvar = 10;
   // do stuff if the value of a is either 1, 2 or 3

   if(a == 1)
    {
       var total = $myvar + 1;
       // do stuff if the value of a is 1
    }

    if(a == 2 || a == 3)
    {
       var total = $myvar + 1;
       // do stuff if the value of a is either 2 or 3
    }
}

This way, the variable $myvar is accessible to everything inside the outer if-block. I'm not completely sure about the scoping rules of PHP, but in c++ (which the language was originally tagged with), $myvar will not be accessible outside the if block.

However, in Javascript, due to its scoping rules, $myvar will still be accessible outside the if-block.

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var $myvar=0,total=0;
switch(a){
    case 1:
    case 2:
    case 3:
        $myvar = 10;
    case 1:
        total =$myvar + 1;
        break;
    case 2:
    case 3:
        total = $myvar + 1;
        break;
}
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1  
I would avoid this pattern. Duplicate cases are totally unnecessary, and some languages will completely barf on this. –  Matthew Blancarte Nov 14 '12 at 18:24
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switch (a){
    case 1:
         do stuff;
         //DONOTBREAK HERE
    case 2:
    case 3:
         if(a== 2 || a == 3){
              //do stuff exclusive to 2 and 3
         }
         //do stuff universal to 1,2,3
         break;
    default:
       //failing case
}
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um... have you looked at This answer? –  Ibu Nov 14 '12 at 18:22
    
This is a C only answer -- the question was language agnostic. –  Hogan Nov 14 '12 at 18:23
    
Do not most languages fall through cases if unbroken? I'm not intimately familiar with the vast majority, but my solution works in any language that lets a switch structure fall through. (syntax modification obviously may be needed) –  Dora Ball Nov 14 '12 at 18:26
    
@DoraBall - nope most languages do not do this. C and C++ do -- C# does not, java took it out -- it is a HORRIBLE "feature" that has cost millions of $$$ because leaving out a simple element (break) does not get caught as an error but instead causes a bug. In C# you can add a goto statement to get the same effect. stackoverflow.com/questions/174155/… This is why I said your answer is C only; because it is. –  Hogan Nov 14 '12 at 18:58
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do it backwards:

if (a < 1 || a > 3)
{ 
   return;
}
else
{
   var $myvar = 10;
   if (a == 1)
   {
      var total = $myvar + 1;
      // do a == 1 stuff 
   }
   else
   {
      total = $myvar + 1;
      // do a == 2 or a == 3 stuff
   }
}
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