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When storing a large number of instances of a custom class (not a "simple" class, e.g. not a std::string, not a std::complex, etc.) in a std::vector, should we pick a simple std::vector<X>, or is std::vector<std::unique_ptr<X>> a better choice?

I wrote some benchmark code (extending code from this blog post about C++11 move semantics improvements on C++03), and it seems that vector<unique_ptr<X>> offers better performance for a 1,500,000 items vector. In fact, on a PC with Windows 7 64-bit, Intel Core i5 quad-core CPU and 8 GB of RAM, I got the following results (test.exe 1500):

  1. vector<unique_ptr<MyObject>>: 1.5 seconds
  2. vector<shared_ptr<MyObject>>: 1.6 seconds
  3. vector<MyObject>: 1.8 seconds

So, in C++03 (where std::unique_ptr is not available), it seems that the best choice is vector<shared_ptr<X>>; instead in C++11 the move-semantics-enabled std::unique_ptr seems to offer the best result.

Am I missing something here? Is this a good C++ guideline that in big vectors it's better to store (smart) pointers to class instances than class instances themselves?

Benchmark code follows:

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
//
// Test vector<X> vs. vector<unique_ptr<X>> vs. vector<shared_ptr<X>>.
//
// Original benchmark code from:
//   http://blogs.msdn.com/b/vcblog/archive/2009/06/23/stl-performance.aspx
//
////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////


#include <exception>    // std::invalid_argument
#include <iostream>     // std::cout
#include <memory>       // std::shared_ptr, std::unique_ptr
#include <ostream>      // std::endl
#include <stdexcept>    // std::exception
#include <string>       // std::wstring
#include <utility>      // std::move
#include <vector>       // std::vector

#include <Windows.h>    // Win32 Platform SDK (high performance counters, etc.)

using namespace std;


// Measure time.
class Stopwatch
{
public:

    Stopwatch()
        : m_start(0),
          m_finish(0)
    {
    }

    static void PerfStartup()
    {
        // to confine the test to run on a single processor 
        // in order to get consistent results for all tests.
        SetThreadAffinityMask(GetCurrentThread(), 1);
        SetThreadIdealProcessor(GetCurrentThread(), 0);
        Sleep(1);
    }

    void Start()
    {
        m_finish = 0;
        m_start = Counter();
    }

    void Stop()
    {
        m_finish = Counter();
    }

    // Elapsed time, in seconds
    double ElapsedTime() const
    {
        return (m_finish - m_start) * 1.0 / Frequency();
    }

    void Reset()
    {
        m_start = m_finish = 0;
    }


private:
    long long m_start;
    long long m_finish;

    static long long Counter() 
    {
        LARGE_INTEGER li;
        QueryPerformanceCounter(&li);
        return li.QuadPart;
    }

    static long long Frequency() 
    {
        LARGE_INTEGER li;
        QueryPerformanceFrequency(&li);
        return li.QuadPart;
    }


// Ban copy
private:
    Stopwatch(const Stopwatch&);
    Stopwatch& operator=(const Stopwatch&);
};


// Measure execution time of a block of code.
class ScopedStopwatch
{
public:

    ScopedStopwatch()
    {
        m_sw.Start();
    }

    ~ScopedStopwatch()
    {
        m_sw.Stop();
        cout << "Elapsed time: " << m_sw.ElapsedTime() << " sec" << endl;
    }

private:
    Stopwatch m_sw;

    ScopedStopwatch(const ScopedStopwatch&);
    ScopedStopwatch& operator=(const ScopedStopwatch&);
};


// User Defined Type
class MyObject
{
public:
    wstring name;
    wstring address;
    wstring telephone;
    wstring name2;
    wstring address2;
    wstring telephone2;

    // Default constructor
    MyObject()
    {
    }

    // Copy Constructor
    MyObject(const MyObject& other)
        : name(other.name),
          telephone(other.telephone),
          address(other.address),
          name2(other.name2),
          telephone2(other.telephone2),
          address2(other.address2)
    {
    }

    // Copy assignment operator
    MyObject& operator=(const MyObject& other)
    {
        if (this != &other)
        {
            name = other.name;
            telephone = other.telephone;
            address = other.address;
            name2 = other.name2;
            telephone2 = other.telephone2;
            address2 = other.address2;
        }

        return *this;
    }

    // Move constructor
    MyObject(MyObject&& other)
        : name(move(other.name)),
          telephone(move(other.telephone)),
          address(move(other.address)),
          name2(move(other.name2)),
          telephone2(move(other.telephone2)),
          address2(move(other.address2))
    {
    }

    // Move assignment operator
    MyObject& operator=(MyObject&& other)
    {
        if (this != &other)
        {
            name = move(other.name);
            telephone = move(other.telephone);
            address = move(other.address);
            name2 = move(other.name2);
            telephone2 = move(other.telephone2);
            address2 = move(other.address2);
        }

        return *this;
    }
};


MyObject MakeTestObject()
{
    MyObject obj;
    obj.name = L"Stephan T. Lavavej Stephan T. Lavavej Stephan T. Lavavej";
    obj.telephone = L"314159265 314159265 314159265 314159265 314159265";
    obj.address = L"127.0.0.0 127.0.0.0 127.0.0.0 127.0.0.0 127.0.0.0 127.0.0.0";
    obj.name2 = L"Mohammad Usman. Mohammad Usman. Mohammad Usman. ";
    obj.telephone2 = L"1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890";
    obj.address2 = L"Republik Of mancunia. Republik Of mancunia Republik Of mancunia";

    return obj;
}


unique_ptr<MyObject> MakeUniqueTestObject()
{
    unique_ptr<MyObject> obj( new MyObject() );
    obj->name = L"Stephan T. Lavavej Stephan T. Lavavej Stephan T. Lavavej";
    obj->telephone = L"314159265 314159265 314159265 314159265 314159265";
    obj->address = L"127.0.0.0 127.0.0.0 127.0.0.0 127.0.0.0 127.0.0.0 127.0.0.0";
    obj->name2 = L"Mohammad Usman. Mohammad Usman. Mohammad Usman. ";
    obj->telephone2 = L"1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890";
    obj->address2 = L"Republik Of mancunia. Republik Of mancunia Republik Of mancunia";

    return obj;
}


shared_ptr<MyObject> MakeSharedTestObject()

{    
    auto obj = make_shared<MyObject>();
    obj->name = L"Stephan T. Lavavej Stephan T. Lavavej Stephan T. Lavavej";
    obj->telephone = L"314159265 314159265 314159265 314159265 314159265";
    obj->address = L"127.0.0.0 127.0.0.0 127.0.0.0 127.0.0.0 127.0.0.0 127.0.0.0";
    obj->name2 = L"Mohammad Usman. Mohammad Usman. Mohammad Usman. ";
    obj->telephone2 = L"1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890";
    obj->address2 = L"Republik Of mancunia. Republik Of mancunia Republik Of mancunia";

    return obj;
}


void Test(int count)
{
    Stopwatch::PerfStartup();

    cout << "Inserting " << count << " items in vector.\n";


    cout << "\nTesting vector<MyObject>\n";
    {
        ScopedStopwatch sw;

        vector<MyObject> v;
        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
        {
            v.push_back(MakeTestObject());
        }
    }


    cout << "\nTesting vector<unique_ptr<MyObject>>\n";
    {
        ScopedStopwatch sw;

        vector<unique_ptr<MyObject>> v;
        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
        {
            v.push_back(MakeUniqueTestObject());
        }
    }


    cout << "\nTesting vector<shared_ptr<MyObject>>\n";
    {
        ScopedStopwatch sw;

        vector<shared_ptr<MyObject>> v;
        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
        {
            v.push_back(MakeSharedTestObject());
        }
    }
}


int main(int argc, char * argv[])
{
    static const int kExitOk = 0;
    static const int kExitError = 1;

    try
    {
        if (argc != 2)
        {
            throw invalid_argument("Bad syntax. Pass insertion count (x 1,000).");
        }

        const int countK = atoi(argv[1]);
        Test(countK * 1000);

        return kExitOk;
    }
    catch (const exception & e)   
    {
        cerr << "*** ERROR: " << e.what() << endl;
        return kExitError;
    }
}

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
share|improve this question
4  
Where possible it's often simpler to either reserve the space you need in your vector or else to use deque instead of vector. It might be worth adding both options to your benchmark for comparison, but either of them might be impossible for a specific use case. I would think that deque is likely to be a less disruptive change than vector<unique_ptr>. You can also look at boost:stable_vector. –  Steve Jessop Nov 14 '12 at 18:21
    
I'd imagine the performance to be the same, but did you try MyObject(MyObject&& src) = default to see if the builtin move constructor works? I didn't see any special memory management criteria where you need to manually move things. –  Sean Nov 14 '12 at 20:38
    
Also, when you say "ban copy", just = delete those methods. E.g. Stopwatch(const Stopwatch&) = delete;, etc. –  Sean Nov 14 '12 at 20:38
    
@Sean: I'm using VC10 (VS2010 SP1), which unfortunately has a very primitive C++11 support; defaulted and deleted functions aren't available even in VC11 (VS2012). –  Mr.C64 Nov 14 '12 at 21:58
    
@Mr.C64 Drat, I was worried you might say something like that. Also, if you wanted to make the comparison of move semantics, you should throw in a copy constructor as a baseline. Move is very good compared to a normal copy ctor. –  Sean Nov 15 '12 at 0:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In C++11, if you are not using a move-enabled objects, then you should use a vector of std::unique_ptr<T> from #include <memory>. std::unique_ptr<T> is lighter weight, carries similar semantics as std::shared_ptr<T> but differs in one important area: object ownership is explicit. In the case of vector, the vector owns the objects it contains. Now, if you are using a move-enabled objects, just use a vector of your object because it will generally be "fast enough." All of the STL enabled containers in C++11 make use of move semantics (i.e. yes, slightly slower, but you gain on the productivity side of things). If performance is an issue, you could fall back to std::unqiue_ptr<T> for reasons outlined below.

If you're using pre-C++11, boost::shared_ptr<T> isn't the worse thing you could do and is probably an appropriate transition path until std::unique_ptr<T> becomes available to you. Use of boost::shared_ptr<T> involves an atomic increment, and an assignment of a pointer. Both pretty cheap, but more expensive (and different semantics) than std::unique_ptr<T>.

It doesn't surprise me that Move constructors are more expensive than moving around std::unique_ptr<T> because a move constructor is still allocating an object (even though its guts/contents are being borrowed, moved, relocated), whereas moving a std::unique_ptr<T> is just an integer/pointer assignment. Use of jemalloc(3) would probably cut the cost of Move constructors, but that's only available on *NIX platforms.

Because of that last point, the benchmark isn't entirely apples-to-apples. If you're looking for consistent performance, std::unique_ptr<T> is probably the way to go (no allocations), but if you're looking for a "native" development idiom that facilitates an easy development metholology wherein performance isn't the most important aspect (i.e. productivity is more important than performance), then go with normal objects with move constructors.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you have a typo in your answer: boost::shared_pointer<T> (in second paragraph) should be boost::shared_ptr<T>. –  Mr.C64 Nov 14 '12 at 22:02
    
Thanks!, fixed. –  Sean Nov 14 '12 at 22:07

Should we store smart pointers to class instances in large std::vector's for better performance?

Unless your class instances are gigantic and moving or copying them will require a lot of work, I'd consider this too early to worry about it. If each move operation requires moving dozens or hundreds of bytes, it will make a much more significant difference. As it is, the vast majority of the operation is vector overhead anyway.

I'll assume you're using a 64 bit system. Right now, sizeof(MyObject) will, I think, equal 24 (It does here anyway). Otherwise you'll be dealing with unique pointers, which are probably sized at 12 bytes, or shared pointers, which are, I think, are sized at 16.

You're saving about 0.3 seconds for 1,500,000 operations, or about 200 nanoseconds for each operation. Is it really worth it? Are you really going to be dealing with many millions of elements in your vector? Could you simplify the whole thing by just storing a pointer to the vector and sharing that (since you're using move semantics and not copy, you should be able to make this work somehow)?

Seems an awful lot like premature optimization to me. So I'm going to say, No, you shouldn't store a vector of smart pointers to instances instead of a vector to instances. Yet.

share|improve this answer
    
it's sizeof(MyObject) that's relevant rather than sizeof(StopWatch). 6 strings is going to be more expensive to move than one unique_ptr, and that's what the benchmark results seem to indicate. +1 though: I agree that a 15-20% speed increase isn't worth a "good C++ guideline" as the questioner asks. It might be worth complicating your container for, but it's often not going to be worth it given that you pay for it in code complexity and possible performance costs elsewhere. –  Steve Jessop Nov 14 '12 at 18:28
    
Whoops. I just used the first class I saw in the code. And they won't be that much bigger. the wstring object has a size of 4. ideone.com/VKco7L With move semantics instead of copies, moving a wstring should be as easy as copying its 4 bytes. –  Wug Nov 14 '12 at 18:31
    
Sure, so about the same as moving a unique_ptr, and the questioner in effect benchmarks one such move vs 6. That size would be impressive on a 64 bit machine like the questioner's, though ;-) –  Steve Jessop Nov 14 '12 at 18:32
    
I believe stl strings use some sort of indexing and indirection. There is otherwise no way that what they do could possibly work. –  Wug Nov 14 '12 at 18:36

It depends on how you use it. If you often copy items, then having pointers instead of value would be faster, because you only have to copy/move pointers. Note that when inserting items, copying is dominant, because when memory for vector is reallocated all items have to be moved/copied to a new location.

When you more often just read or modify the items in the vector, then having items stored as values would be faster, because there is one less indirection and better memory locality (better use of CPU cache). Also there is less memory used if items are stored directly. The small drawback of slower insertion can be avoided by using reserve and emplace_back. Then it will most probably be even faster than using vector of pointers.

I would always use a vector of values unless I need that the objects are pointed to by some other code.

share|improve this answer

It all depends from the class itself and the use case. If you have a polymorphic class there is no other way than store pointers (to base class). Those pojnters can be raw pointers or smart pointers. In the first case you have to remember about proper cleanup every time you remove an element from the vector or destroy it. The latter one is more user friendly and in case of unique_ptr should not provide any overhead (speed, size, etc) comparing to raw pointer. shared_ptr will add significant overhead in terms of memory (shared state may have 24-48 bytes) and speed (thread safe reference counting).

If your class is not polymorhic one it depends again. If your class is small or easy to move (eg. has pointer to data instead of data member) than storing it by value should be better because of smaller number of dynamic allocation, releases and pointers indirections. Cache locality will also help you a lot if you progress through std::vector with predictable pattern. However if your class is huge and thus heavy to move it depends again. If it is a POD type than std::vector will probably use memmove for copying of memory that is really fast and should not kill your performance. For other classes copy(move)-constructor will be called for each item which will cost you some performance. In such a case using pointers may provide you a better performance. Alternatively you can consider using other containers like std::deque or std::list that limit needed number of copies for elements stored by values.

share|improve this answer
    
I meant "no overhead" comparing to raw pointer. I assume it was not clear enough so I will edit the answer. Thanks. –  Mateusz Pusz Nov 14 '12 at 21:18

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