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I want to calculate the coefficients of a spline interpolation by scipy. In MATLAB:

x=[0:3];
y=[0,1,4,0];
spl=spline(x,y);
disp(spl.coefs);

and it will return:

ans =

   -1.5000    5.5000   -3.0000         0
   -1.5000    1.0000    3.5000    1.0000
   -1.5000   -3.5000    1.0000    4.0000

But i can't do that by interpolate.splrep in scipy. Can you tell me how to calc it?

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1  
You can easily get the knot coefficients. Will that do? –  brentlance Nov 14 '12 at 23:03
    
It not return coefficients like MATLAB result. –  Gochit Nov 15 '12 at 5:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I'm not sure there is any way to get exactly those coefficients from scipy. What scipy.interpolate.splrep gives you is the coefficients for the knots for a b-spline. What Matlab's spline gives you appears to be the partial polynomial coefficients describing the cubic equations connecting the points you pass in, which leads me to believe that the Matlab spline is a control-point based spline such as a Hermite or Catmull-Rom instead of a b-spline.

However, scipy.interpolate.interpolate.spltopp does provide a way to get the partial polynomial coefficients of a b-spline. Unfortunately, it doesn't seem to work very well.

>>> import scipy.interpolate
>>> x = [0, 1, 2, 3]
>>> y = [0, 1, 4, 0]
>>> tck = scipy.interpolate.splrep(x, y)
>>> tck
Out: 
    (array([ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  3.,  3.,  3.,  3.]),
    array([  3.19142761e-16,  -3.00000000e+00,   1.05000000e+01,
        0.00000000e+00,   0.00000000e+00,   0.00000000e+00,
        0.00000000e+00,   0.00000000e+00]),
    3)

>>> pp = scipy.interpolate.interpolate.spltopp(tck[0][1:-1], tck[1], tck[2])

>>> pp.coeffs.T
Out: 
    array([[ -4.54540394e-322,   0.00000000e+000,   0.00000000e+000,
           0.00000000e+000],
        [ -4.54540394e-322,   0.00000000e+000,   0.00000000e+000,
           0.00000000e+000],
        [ -4.54540394e-322,   0.00000000e+000,   0.00000000e+000,
           0.00000000e+000],
        [  0.00000000e+000,   0.00000000e+000,   0.00000000e+000,
           0.00000000e+000],
        [  0.00000000e+000,   0.00000000e+000,   0.00000000e+000,
           0.00000000e+000]])

Note that there is one set of coefficients per knot, not one for each of the original points passed in. Also, multiplying the coefficients by the b-spline basis matrix doesn't seem to be very helpful.

>>> bsbm = array([[-1,  3, -3,  1], [ 3, -6,  3,  0], [-3,  0,  3,  0], 
                 [ 1,  4,  1,  0]]) * 1.0/6
Out: 
    array([[-0.16666667,  0.5       , -0.5       ,  0.16666667],
        [ 0.5       , -1.        ,  0.5       ,  0.        ],
        [-0.5       ,  0.        ,  0.5       ,  0.        ],
        [ 0.16666667,  0.66666667,  0.16666667,  0.        ]])

>>> dot(pp.coeffs.T, bsbm)
Out: 
    array([[  7.41098469e-323,  -2.27270197e-322,   2.27270197e-322,
           -7.41098469e-323],
        [  7.41098469e-323,  -2.27270197e-322,   2.27270197e-322,
           -7.41098469e-323],
        [  7.41098469e-323,  -2.27270197e-322,   2.27270197e-322,
           -7.41098469e-323],
        [  0.00000000e+000,   0.00000000e+000,   0.00000000e+000,
           0.00000000e+000],
        [  0.00000000e+000,   0.00000000e+000,   0.00000000e+000,
           0.00000000e+000]])

The FORTRAN Piecewise Polynomial Package, PPPack, has a command bsplpp that converts from B-spline to piecewise polynomial form, which may serve your needs. Unfortunately, there isn't a Python wrapper for PPPack at this time.

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Thank you, your answer is helpful, it gave me more knowledge. But I solved this problem by another spline interpolation python script. –  Gochit Nov 15 '12 at 16:22
    
No problem. Glad I could be helpful. Which script did you use to solve the problem? –  brentlance Nov 15 '12 at 16:35
1  
I used spline interpolation script in "Numerical Methods in Engineering with Python". –  Gochit Nov 15 '12 at 16:45
    
I did not know this book existed. Thank you!- –  brentlance Nov 15 '12 at 16:48

The docs on scipy.interpolate.splrep say that you can get the coefficients:

Returns:

  tck : tuple

  (t,c,k) a tuple containing the vector of knots, the B-spline coefficients, and the degree of the spline.
share|improve this answer
    
I tried : tck=interpolate.splrep(x,y,k=3,s=0) And it return coefficients: array([ -4.09317213e-17, -3.00000000e+00,1.05000000e+01,0.00000000e+00,0.00000000e+00, 0.00000000e+00,0.00000000e+00,0.00000000e+00]). It's different from my MATLAB result –  Gochit Nov 15 '12 at 5:38

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