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What is a one-liner code for setting a string in python to the string, 0 if the string is empty?

# line_parts[0] can be empty
# if so, set a to the string, 0
# one-liner solution should be part of the following line of code if possible
a = line_parts[0] ...
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@biznez Don't forget you can accept an answer. –  Andrew Keeton Aug 27 '09 at 2:24
    
I'd say: should accept an answer. It's only polite, after people have put effort in on your behalf. –  chrispy Aug 27 '09 at 8:08
    
Do you mean string is empty(means string of length zero) or None ? –  Manish Sinha Aug 31 '09 at 11:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 31 down vote accepted
a = line_parts[0] or "0"

This is one of the nicest Python idioms, making it easy to provide default values. It's often used like this for default values of functions:

def fn(arg1, arg2=None):
    arg2 = arg2 or ["weird default value"]
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1  
+1 I learned something new. –  Andrew Keeton Aug 27 '09 at 2:20
4  
To clarify, if it wasn't clear from Ned's answer: when it comes to strings, an empty string always evaluates to False, and a non-empty string always evaluates to True -- that's why or works perfectly in this situation. –  Mark Rushakoff Aug 27 '09 at 2:22
4  
When using this, make sure that you never expect arg2 to be 0 or ''.. –  John Fouhy Aug 27 '09 at 2:47
2  
I don't understand - what the difference then to give a default value in a definition of a function: def fn(arg1, arg2="weird default value"): ? –  legesh Sep 24 '09 at 12:13
    
You can do that, but have to be careful with mutable defaults, or defaults based on changing data that may not be available at definition time. –  Ned Batchelder Sep 24 '09 at 15:33
a = '0' if not line_parts[0] else line_parts[0]
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5  
Would be more clear as: a = line_parts[0] if line_parts[0] else '0' –  recursive Aug 27 '09 at 5:17

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