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I am trying to use glut in c++ to create a drawing based on information from a file I input into my main function.

int main (int argc, char** argv)  //I think this is all relevant info in main
{   
glutDisplayFunc (display);

fstream file = fstream ("Tree.txt");
Tree myTree = Tree(file);
}

static    //this is the function I need to draw from but it can't take any parameters
void display(void)
{  
}

static void draw_frame(Tree::Node* t) //my draw function needs access to info from my file stream
{
    int x = t->xValue;  //for example I need to access these variables
    int y = t->yValue;
}

I tried making Tree* myTree a global variable but I just got more errors and it would stop reading in my file altogether. If anyone has any ideas I would be very grateful!

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1 Answer 1

In your case, you will need to put Tree as a global variable. I would advise moving your "Tree building" code from the constructor and have it initialized from the main function. Something along the lines of:

Tree GTree;
int main (int argc, char** argv)  //I think this is all relevant info in main
{   
    glutDisplayFunc (display);

    fstream file = fstream ("Tree.txt");
    GTree.Initialize(file);
}

Then, in display you can use your GTree for the rendering.

Note that if you need your rendering to be updated, you will need to call glutPostRedisplay or have your display as your glutIdleFunc

share|improve this answer
    
When I try to make my global variable:Tree myTree; it tells me there is no appropriate default constructor available. –  user1824239 Nov 14 '12 at 19:16
    
Then add one. A default construction is a parameter-less constructor like Tree() {} –  emartel Nov 14 '12 at 19:18
    
When I try to make my own default constructor like this: Tree::Tree() {root=NULL;} (not sure if that is even right) it says Error: no instance of overloaded function "Tree::Tree" matches the specified type –  user1824239 Nov 14 '12 at 19:19
    
Should I be doing this (or something) in my header file rather than my cpp file? –  user1824239 Nov 14 '12 at 19:26
    
@user1824239 You must declare the default constructor in the class (in its definition in the header), and either provide its body right there (inlined), or define it in some .cpp file. –  Angew Nov 14 '12 at 19:30

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