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I was working on a school assignment (doing Hoffman encoding) and I need some sort of bitbuffer to use to put all the bits in. While I did find several things doing a google, most of the stuff was garbage - didn't compile, referenced other libraries I didn't have, etc. Does anyone have an actual good bitbuffer class out there? All that I really even want to do is read and write bits one at a time. If nobody has a good one, is there some existing data structure that would be good for holding that sort of data efficently that I could use to write one myself?

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closed as off-topic by Andrew Barber Mar 29 '14 at 7:02

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1  
Have you looked at BitSet ? –  jlordo Nov 14 '12 at 19:13
3  
What's wrong with java.util.BitSet? –  Jim Garrison Nov 14 '12 at 19:13
    
@jlordo, @Jim Garrison - the problem with java.util.BitSet is that bitsets are fixed-size, and I need to be able to append bits at will. –  AJMansfield Nov 14 '12 at 20:14

3 Answers 3

I faced same problem when solving Huffman code implementation, I used this library and tested it, it works..

BitOutputStream

    import java.io.*;

/**
 * Write bits-at-a-time where the number of bits is between 1 and 32.
 * Client programs must call <code>flush</code> or
 * <code>close</code> when finished writing or not all bits will be written.
 * This class is intended to be used with <code>BitInputStream</code> to
 * facilitate reading and writing data in a bits-at-a-time manner.
 * <P>
 * Updated for version 2.0 to extend java.io.OutputStream
 * <P>
 * Any exceptions generated are rethrown as <code>RuntimeException</code> objects
 * so client code does not have to catch or rethrow them.
 * <P>
 * @author Owen Astrachan
 * @version 1.0, July 2000
 * @version 2.0, October 2004
 * @version 2.1, March 2010, Fixed >> to >>> bug in writeBits
 */


public class BitOutputStream extends OutputStream
{


    private OutputStream  myOutput;
    private int           myBuffer;
    private int           myBitsToGo;

    private static final int bmask[] = {
        0x00, 0x01, 0x03, 0x07, 0x0f, 0x1f, 0x3f, 0x7f, 0xff,
        0x1ff,0x3ff,0x7ff,0xfff,0x1fff,0x3fff,0x7fff,0xffff,
        0x1ffff,0x3ffff,0x7ffff,0xfffff,0x1fffff,0x3fffff,
        0x7fffff,0xffffff,0x1ffffff,0x3ffffff,0x7ffffff,
        0xfffffff,0x1fffffff,0x3fffffff,0x7fffffff,0xffffffff
    };

    private static final int BITS_PER_BYTE = 8;

    /**
     * Required by OutputStream subclasses, write the low
     * 8-bits to the underlying outputstream
     */
    public void write(int b) throws IOException {
        myOutput.write(b);
    }

    /**
     * Create a stream that writes-through to the <code>OutputStream</code> object
     * passed as a parameter.
     * @param out is the output stream to which bits are written
     */
    public BitOutputStream(OutputStream out){
        myOutput = out;
        initialize();
    }

    private void initialize(){
        myBuffer = 0;
        myBitsToGo = BITS_PER_BYTE;
    }
    /**
     * Construct a bit-at-a-time output stream with specified file
     * name.
     * @param filename is the name of the file being written
     * @throws RuntimeException if opening file fails for either FileNotFound
     * or for Security exceptoins
     */
    public BitOutputStream(String filename)
    {
        try{
            myOutput = new BufferedOutputStream(new FileOutputStream(filename)); 
        }
        catch (FileNotFoundException fnf){
            throw new RuntimeException("could not create " + filename + " " + fnf);
        }
        catch(SecurityException se){
            throw new RuntimeException("security exception on write " + se);
        }
        initialize();
    }


    /**
     * Flushes bits not yet written, must be called by client
     * programs if <code>close</code> isn't called.
     * @throws RuntimeException if there's a problem writing bits
     */
    public void flush()
    {
        if (myBitsToGo != BITS_PER_BYTE) {
            try{
                write( (myBuffer << myBitsToGo) );
            }
            catch (java.io.IOException ioe){
                throw new RuntimeException("error writing bits on flush " + ioe);
            }
            myBuffer = 0;
            myBitsToGo = BITS_PER_BYTE;
        }

        try{
            myOutput.flush();    
        }
        catch (java.io.IOException ioe){
            throw new RuntimeException("error on flush " + ioe);
        }
    }

    /**
     * Releases system resources associated with file and
     * flushes bits not yet written. Either this function
     * or flush must be called or not all bits will be written
     * @throws RuntimeException if close fails
     */
    public void close()
    {
        flush();
        try{
            myOutput.close();
        }
        catch (IOException ioe){
            throw new RuntimeException("error closing BitOutputStream " + ioe);
        }
    }

    /**
     * Write specified number of bits from value to a file.
     * @param howManyBits is number of bits to write (1-32)
     * @param value is source of bits, rightmost bits are written
     * @throws RuntimeException if there's an I/O problem writing bits
     */

    public void writeBits(int howManyBits, int value)
    {
        value &= bmask[howManyBits];  // only right most bits valid

        while (howManyBits >= myBitsToGo){
            myBuffer = (myBuffer << myBitsToGo) |
                       (value >>> (howManyBits - myBitsToGo));
            try{
                write(myBuffer);    
            }
            catch (java.io.IOException ioe){
                throw new RuntimeException("error writing bits " + ioe);
            }

            value &= bmask[howManyBits - myBitsToGo];
            howManyBits -= myBitsToGo;
            myBitsToGo = BITS_PER_BYTE;
            myBuffer = 0;
        }

        if (howManyBits > 0) {
            myBuffer = (myBuffer << howManyBits) | value;
            myBitsToGo -= howManyBits;
        }
    }
}

BitInputStream

import java.io.*;

/**
 * Reads bits-at-a-time where the number of bits is between 1 and 32.
 * Updated for version 2.0 to extend java.io.InputStream. This class
 * can be used together with <code>BitOutputStream</code> to facilitate
 * reading and writing data several bits-at-a-time. BitInputStream objects
 * that are constructed from a File support <code>reset()</code>. However,
 * if constructed from an <code>InputStream</code> an object cannot be reset.
 * <P>
 * Any exceptions generated are rethrown as <code>RuntimeException</code> objects
 * so client code does not have to catch or rethrow them. (Unless the extension
 * of <code>InputStream</code> requires throwing as another type of exception, e.g.,
 * as with method <code>read</code>.
 * <P>
 * @author Owen Astrachan
 * @version 1.0, July 2000
 * @version 2.0, October 2004
 */

public class BitInputStream extends InputStream
{
    private InputStream     myInput;
    private int             myBitCount;
    private int             myBuffer;
    private File            myFile;

    private static final int bmask[] = {
        0x00, 0x01, 0x03, 0x07, 0x0f, 0x1f, 0x3f, 0x7f, 0xff,
        0x1ff,0x3ff,0x7ff,0xfff,0x1fff,0x3fff,0x7fff,0xffff,
        0x1ffff,0x3ffff,0x7ffff,0xfffff,0x1fffff,0x3fffff,
        0x7fffff,0xffffff,0x1ffffff,0x3ffffff,0x7ffffff,
        0xfffffff,0x1fffffff,0x3fffffff,0x7fffffff,0xffffffff
    };

    private static final int BITS_PER_BYTE = 8;
    /**
     * Construct a bit-at-a-time input stream from a file whose
     * name is supplied. 
     * @param filename is the name of the file that will be read.
     * @throws RuntimeException if filename cannot be opened.
     */
    public BitInputStream(String filename)
    {
        this(new File(filename));
    }

    /**
     * Construct a bit-at-a-time input stream from <code>file</code>.
     * @param file is the File that is the source of the input
     * @throws RuntimeExceptoin if file cannot be opened.
     */
    public BitInputStream(File file)
    {
        myFile = file;  
        try {
            reset();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            throw new RuntimeException("could not open file for reading bits "+e);
        }

    }

    /**
     * Open a bit-at-a-time stream that reads from supplied InputStream. If this
     * constructor is used the BitInputStream is not reset-able.
     * @param in is the stream from which bits are read.
     */
    public BitInputStream(InputStream in){
        myInput = in;
        myFile = null;
    }

    /**
     * Return true if the stream has been initialized from a File and
     * is thus reset-able. If constructed from an InputStream it is not reset-able.
     * @return true if stream can be reset (it has been constructed appropriately from a File).
     */
    public boolean markSupported(){
        return myFile != null;
    }

    /**
     * Reset stream to beginning. The implementation creates a new
     * stream.
     * @throws IOException if not reset-able (e.g., constructed from InputStream).
     */

    public void reset() throws IOException
    {
        if (! markSupported()){
            throw new IOException("not resettable");
        }
        try{
            close();
            myInput = new BufferedInputStream(new FileInputStream(myFile));
        }
        catch (FileNotFoundException fnf){
            System.err.println("error opening " + myFile.getName() + " " + fnf);
        }
        myBuffer = myBitCount = 0;
    } 

    /**
     * Closes the input stream.
     * @throws RuntimeException if the close fails
     */

    public void close()
    {
        try{
            if (myInput != null) {
                myInput.close();
            }
        }
        catch (java.io.IOException ioe){
           throw new RuntimeException("error closing bit stream " + ioe);
        }
    }

    /**
     * Returns the number of bits requested as rightmost bits in
     * returned value, returns -1 if not enough bits available to
     * satisfy the request.
     *
     * @param howManyBits is the number of bits to read and return
     * @return the value read, only rightmost <code>howManyBits</code>
     * are valid, returns -1 if not enough bits left
     */

    public int readBits(int howManyBits) throws IOException
    {
        int retval = 0;
        if (myInput == null){
            return -1;
        }

        while (howManyBits > myBitCount){
            retval |= ( myBuffer << (howManyBits - myBitCount) );
            howManyBits -= myBitCount;
            try{
                if ( (myBuffer = myInput.read()) == -1) {
                    return -1;
                }
            }
            catch (IOException ioe) {
                throw new IOException("bitreading trouble "+ioe);
            }
            myBitCount = BITS_PER_BYTE;
        }

        if (howManyBits > 0){
            retval |= myBuffer >> (myBitCount - howManyBits);
            myBuffer &= bmask[myBitCount - howManyBits];
            myBitCount -= howManyBits;
        }
        return retval;
    }

    /**
     * Required by classes extending InputStream, returns
     * the next byte from this stream as an int value.
     * @return the next byte from this stream
     */
    public int read() throws IOException {
        return readBits(8);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

A Queue makes a good buffer (FIFO) in general. A bit can be represented using a boolean. The Queue implementation in the Java library is generic, so you could instantiate your bit buffer like this:

Queue<Boolean> bbuff = new Queue<Boolean>();
Boolean imabit = false;

You enqueue/buffer bits like this:

bbuff.add(imabit);

And you dequeue/read(and delete) the next bits like this:

Boolean dequeuedbit = bbuff.remove();
share|improve this answer
    
booleans are almost never stored in Java as only one bit, they are usually at least a byte. This makes your queue at least 8 times larger than any other solution here. –  Johan S Jul 8 '14 at 9:04
1  
@Johan S: Thanks for the comment! At least I learned something :) –  das_weezul Sep 11 '14 at 9:08

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