Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a file called 'plainlinks' that looks like this:

13080. ftp://ftp3.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/noaa/999999-94092-2012.gz
13081. ftp://ftp3.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/noaa/999999-94094-2012.gz
13082. ftp://ftp3.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/noaa/999999-94096-2012.gz
13083. ftp://ftp3.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/noaa/999999-94097-2012.gz
13084. ftp://ftp3.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/noaa/999999-94098-2012.gz
13085. ftp://ftp3.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/noaa/999999-94644-2012.gz
13086. ftp://ftp3.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/noaa/999999-94645-2012.gz
13087. ftp://ftp3.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/noaa/999999-94995-2012.gz
13088. ftp://ftp3.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/noaa/999999-94996-2012.gz
13089. ftp://ftp3.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/noaa/999999-96404-2012.gz

I need to produce output that looks like this:

999999-94092
999999-94094
999999-94096
999999-94097
999999-94098
999999-94644
999999-94645
999999-94995
999999-94996
999999-96404

Total awk/sed newb so please help me out!

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Using sed:

sed -E 's/.*\/(.*)-.*/\1/' plainlinks

Output:

999999-94092
999999-94094
999999-94096
999999-94097
999999-94098
999999-94644
999999-94645
999999-94995
999999-94996
999999-96404

To save the changes to the file use the -i option:

sed -Ei 's/.*\/(.*)-.*/\1/' plainlinks

Or to save to a new file then redirect:

sed -E 's/.*\/(.*)-.*/\1/' plainlinks > newfile.txt

Explanation:

s/    # subsitution
.*    # match anything
\/    # upto the last forward-slash (escaped to not confused a sed)
(.*)  # anything after the last forward-slash (captured in brackets)
-     # upto a hypen
.*    # anything else left on line
/     # end match; start replace 
\1    # the value captured in the first (only) set of brackets
/     # end
share|improve this answer
    
You need to add -2012 to the "non matching" part of the regex –  Kamil Šrot Nov 14 '12 at 19:47
    
@KamilŠrot I was still in the process of editing... –  iiSeymour Nov 14 '12 at 19:49
    
I noticed it too late :-) cheers –  Kamil Šrot Nov 14 '12 at 19:50
1  
Thanks a ton that did it –  Mikhail Furlender Nov 14 '12 at 20:02

Assuming the format stays consistent as you have described, you can do it with awk:

awk 'BEGIN{FS="[/-]"; OFS="-"} {print $7, $8}' plainlinks > output_file

Output:

999999-94092
999999-94094
999999-94096
999999-94097
999999-94098
999999-94644
999999-94645
999999-94995
999999-94996
999999-96404

Explanation:

  • awk reads your input file one line at a time, breaking each line into "fields"
  • 'BEGIN{FS="[/-]"; OFS="-"} specifies that delimiter used on the input lines should be either / or -, it also specifies that the output should be delimited by -
  • {print $7, $8}' tells awk to print the 7th and 8th field of each line, in this case 999999 and 9xxxx
  • plainlinks is the where the name of the input file would go
  • > output_file redirects output to a file named output_file
share|improve this answer

Just with the shell's parameter expansion:

while IFS= read -r line; do
    tmp=${line##*noaa/}
    echo ${tmp%-????.gz}
done < plainlinks
share|improve this answer

Just for fun.

awk -F\/ '{print substr($7,0,12)}' plainlinks

or with grep

grep -Eo '[0-9]{6}-[0-9]{5}' plainlinks

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for simpler grep solution. –  iiSeymour Nov 14 '12 at 20:11
    
@sudo_o well thanks, +1 for your solution. for being first. –  matchew Nov 14 '12 at 20:25
    
agreed, +1 for the elegant grep solution –  sampson-chen Nov 14 '12 at 20:42
    
@sampson-chen, ok, +1 for you too. –  matchew Nov 14 '12 at 20:47

If the format stays the same, no need for sed or awk:

cat your_file | cut -d "/" -f 7- | cut -d "-" -f 1,2
share|improve this answer
    
If the format doesn't stay the same, the sed and awk solutions will break just as much as this. :) –  Kaz Oct 8 '13 at 0:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.