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I'm currently working on a little web scraping project with Ruby and xPath. Unfortunatly the website is very bad structured, which leads me to a litte problem:

<h3>Relevant Headline</h3>
<p class="class_a class_b">Content starts in this paragraph...</p>
<p class="class_a ">...but this content belongs to the preceding paragraph</p>
<p class="class_a class_b">Content starts in this paragraph...</p>
<p class="class_a ">...but this content belongs to the preceding paragraph</p>
<h3>Some other Headline</h3>

As you can see, there are 2 h3-Tags which frame several p-tags. I want all the framed p-tags to be selected. I found already the following xPath to do that:

h3[contains(text(),"Relevant")]/following-sibling::p[1 = count(preceding-sibling::h3[1] | ../h3[contains(text(),"Relevant")])]

But now comes the difficulty: two of these paragraphs above belong together. The paragraph with class_b (first one) begins a new data entry and the next one (second) belongs to this entry. With 3 and 4 it's the same. The problem is: Sometimes 3 paragraphs belong together, sometimes 4, but most of the time there is a pair of paragraphs belonging together.

How do I select these inner paragraphs by groups and combine them to one string in Ruby?

share|improve this question
    
What gem are you using for the project? Does the solution have to be pure xpath? –  Justin Ko Nov 14 '12 at 21:05
    
I switched to xpath because I found the xpath solution for selecting the paragraphs between the two headlines above. I prefer to scrape with nokogiri and its css-method. But if my problem requires xpath, I'll use it (even if I it's very heavy to understand, at least to me ;)) –  zinky Nov 14 '12 at 21:31

2 Answers 2

It can be done with xpath but I think it's easier to group them with slice_before:

doc.search('*').slice_before{|n| n.name == 'h3'}.each do |h3_group|
  h3_group.slice_before{|n| n[:class] && n[:class]['class_b']}.to_a[1..-1].each do |p_group|
    puts p_group.map(&:text) * ' '
  end
end

UPDATE

Another option using css:

doc.search('p.class_b').each do |p|
  str, next_node = p.text, p
  while next_node = next_node.at('+ p:not([class*=class_b])')
    str += " #{next_node.text}"
  end
  puts str
end
share|improve this answer
    
Hello pguardiario, thanks for your answer as well. It's more readable to me than justin's approach. I didn't know about the slice_before method. Here also the question: What does ´to_a[1..-1]´ do? –  zinky Nov 15 '12 at 13:55
    
because slice_before returns enumerable, to_a makes it an array so we can select a range. [1..-1] means skip the first element, which is the h3. –  pguardiario Nov 15 '12 at 22:55

If you do not mind using a combination of xpath and nokogiri, you can do:

paragraph_text = Array.new
doc.xpath('//p[preceding-sibling::h3[1][contains(text(), "Relevant")]]').each do |p|
    if p.attribute('class').text.include?('class_b')
        paragraph_text << p.content
    else
        paragraph_text[-1] += p.text
    end
end
puts paragraph_text
#=> ["Content starts in this paragraph......but this content belongs to the preceding paragraph",  "Content starts in this paragraph......but this content belongs to the preceding paragraph"]

Basically the xpath is used to get the paragraph tags. Then, using nokogiri/ruby, iterate through the paragraphs and formulate the strings.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey Justin, thanks for your answer, it is very helpful to me. I don't understand what ´paragraph_text[-1]´ means? What is the index [-1] in an array? –  zinky Nov 15 '12 at 13:53
    
In an array, [-1] gets the last element. It is the same as how you would normally get an element by index. The negative value, in a sense, means to go backwards. In the context of the code here, it is saying to add the text to the last string with 'class_b'. –  Justin Ko Nov 15 '12 at 14:09

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