Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have estimates of odds ratio with corresponding 95% CI of six pollutants overs 4 lag periods. How can I create a vertical plot similar to the attached figure in R? The figure below was created in SPSS. Sample data that produced the figure is the following:

lag pollut  or  lcl ucl
0   CO  0.97    0.90    1.06
0   PM10    1.00    0.91    1.09
0   NO  0.97    0.92    1.02
0   NO2 1.01    0.89    1.15
0   SO2 0.97    0.85    1.11
0   Ozone   1.00    0.87    1.15
1   CO  1.03    0.95    1.10
1   PM10    0.93    0.86    1.01
1   NO  1.01    0.97    1.06
1   NO2 1.08    0.97    1.20
1   SO2 0.94    0.84    1.04
1   Ozone   0.94    0.84    1.04
2   CO  1.09    1.02    1.16
2   PM10    1.04    0.96    1.13
2   NO  1.04    1.00    1.08
2   NO2 1.07    0.96    1.18
2   SO2 1.05    0.95    1.17
2   Ozone   0.93    0.84    1.03
3   CO  0.98    0.91    1.06
3   PM10    1.14    1.05    1.24
3   NO  0.99    0.95    1.04
3   NO2 1.01    0.91    1.12
3   SO2 1.11    1.00    1.23
3   Ozone   1.00    0.90    1.11

Odds ratio and 95 % CI plot created in SPSS

share|improve this question
    
There is code on how to create a plot with 95%CI here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Mark_W._Miller I do not know whether that code will help with your data set. –  Mark Miller Nov 14 '12 at 20:14
    
Odds ratios really should be on a logarithmic scale (i.e., the vertical distance between 0.5 and 1 should be the same distance as between 1 and 2 because both are a doubling of the odds). ggplot2 can do this with scale_y_log10() –  MattBagg Dec 11 '12 at 19:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Assuming your data are in datf...

I'd sort it first into just what you want order wise.

datf <- datf[order(datf$pollut, datf$lag), ]

You want a space before and after every lab grouping so I'd add some extra rows in that are NA. That makes it easier because then you'll automatically have blanks in your plot calls.

datfPlusNA <- lapply(split(datf, datf$pollut), function(x) rbind(NA, x, NA))
datf <- do.call(rbind, datfPlusNA)

Now that you have your data.frame sorted and with the extra NAs the plotting is easy.

nr <- nrow(datf)  # find out how many rows all together
with(datf, {# this allows entering your commands more succinctly
    # first you could set up the plot so you can select the order of drawing
    plot(1:nr, or, ylim = c(0.8, 1.3), type = 'n', xaxt = 'n', xlab = '', ylab = 'Odds Ratio and 95% CI', frame.plot = TRUE, panel.first = grid(nx = NA, ny = NULL))
    # arrows(1:nr, lcl, 1:nr, ucl, length = 0.02, angle = 90, code = 3, col = factor(lag)) 
    # you could use arrows above but you don't want ends so segments is easier
    segments(1:nr, lcl, 1:nr, ucl, col = factor(lag))
    # add your points
    points(1:nr, or, pch = 19, cex = 0.6)
    xLabels <- na.omit(unique(pollut))
    axis(1, seq(4, 34, by = 6) - 0.5, xLabels)
})
abline(h = 1.0)

There are packages that make this kind of thing easier but if you can do it like this you can start doing any graphs that you can imagine.

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks John. The ucl arrow is missing and I have added "arrows(1:nr, or, 1:nr, ucl)". The code created beautiful plot. It would be perfect with (1) a reference horizontal line at 1 (2) smaller arrow heads. –  Meso Nov 14 '12 at 22:32
    
Arrow heads or extra terminating lines on confidence intervals, or any error bar, are generally considered a no no there days. It's because it makes the end of the bar more special than it really is... you do expect data after that, you're just going to interpret it differently. –  John Nov 15 '12 at 2:42
    
You should really read the help on arrows (the ones I have in there now look good). –  John Nov 15 '12 at 2:59
    
horizontal line added and horizontal grid lines... vertical grid lines are useless in this plot –  John Nov 15 '12 at 3:07
    
Thanks again. I have now beautiful figures and above all elegant codes that I could use in future. I also like both options (yours and that of Largh) that would allow flexibility. –  Meso Nov 15 '12 at 7:12

You can also do this with ggplot2. The code is somewhat shorter:

 dat <- read.table("clipboard", header = T)
 dat$lag <- paste0("L", dat$lag)

 library(ggplot2)

 ggplot(dat, aes(x = pollut, y = or, ymin = lcl, ymax = ucl)) + geom_pointrange(aes(col = factor(lag)), position=position_dodge(width=0.30)) + 
 ylab("Odds ratio & 95% CI") + geom_hline(aes(yintercept = 1)) + scale_color_discrete(name = "Lag") + xlab("")

enter image description here

EDIT: Here is a version is closer to the SPSS figure:

ggplot(dat, aes(x = pollut, y = or, ymin = lcl, ymax = ucl)) + geom_linerange(aes(col = factor(lag)), position=position_dodge(width=0.30)) +
geom_point(aes(shape = factor(lag)), position=position_dodge(width=0.30)) + ylab("Odds ratio & 95% CI") + geom_hline(aes(yintercept = 1)) + xlab("")
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Largh. The two codes produced what I have really wanted to have. –  Meso Nov 14 '12 at 22:39
2  
+1 though I would use a +scale_y_log10() since its an odds ratio –  MattBagg Dec 11 '12 at 19:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.