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We migrate from WinForms to WPF, refactoring legacy spaghetti code.
Many many forms are interconnected. When one form raises the event, the second one handles it, refreshes something, raises the event itself and so on. Eventually this chain of calls comes back to the first form and can be repeated several times. A kind of recursion.
Most of these 'magic circles' are due to flaws in desing. Nonetheless I want to disable reentrancy.
Here by reentrancy I mean that messenger.Send<MsgType>() can not be called inside already running messanger.Send<MsgType>().

Is it possible to do what I need without decorating the messenger?

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I'm not sure what you mean. There is no default behavior as far as I know in the Messenger class that would cause this "re-entrancy" which you describe. You're gonna have to post some sample code... –  bugged87 Nov 20 '12 at 16:08
    
@bugged87 yes, there's no such behavior. It's our code what causes the reentrancy. What I ask about is whether Messenger can detect such situations. –  voroninp Nov 21 '12 at 17:16
    
Without seeing a sample of this code where the "re-entrancy" is occurring all can I say is simply don't call the Send method from within its own callback. I have no idea why you would be doing something like that anyway. What benefit could it possibly provide? The situation your describing sounds like a gross misunderstanding and misuse of the Messenger class. I don't think it was designed for "event bubbling". It was designed for decoupled communication between two view models or a view model and a view. But it sounds like you're trying to squeeze WinForms behavior out of it. So why switch? –  bugged87 Nov 22 '12 at 2:54
    
You should read up on the Messenger class here and here. –  bugged87 Nov 22 '12 at 2:56
    
Reentrancy is the given behavior of the system. Messenger does not prevent it or signal about it by default. –  voroninp Nov 24 '12 at 14:27

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