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I try to convert an unsigned char* to string but the problem I get this error from my console :

glibc detected ** free(): invalid next size (fast): 0x097a1060

Minimized code :

unsigned char * base64= NULL;
base64 = (unsigned char *)"test";
std::string str((const char *)base64, strlen((const char*)base64)) ;
std::cout<<str; 

PS : I have a function that returns an unsigned char*

Thank you.

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closed as too localized by casperOne Nov 16 '12 at 14:30

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error on which line? –  djechlin Nov 14 '12 at 20:13
    
Does your code use that function that returns an unsigned char rather than a literal "test"? If so, that function's body might be where the actual problem lies. –  Mat Nov 14 '12 at 20:14
1  
Btw, (unsigned char *) should really be (const unsigned char *). –  user529758 Nov 14 '12 at 20:15
    
I think your function is returning a pointer that is no longer valid. –  shiplu.mokadd.im Nov 14 '12 at 20:16
    
When I compile I don`t have an error just when I execute –  Mils Nov 14 '12 at 20:16

1 Answer 1

My best guess is that you're trying to free this pointer.

base64 = (unsigned char*)"test";

is a reference to a constant. Here's my minimal example:

#include <string>
#include <cstring>
#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
        unsigned char * base64= NULL;
        base64 = (unsigned char *)"test";
        std::string str((const char *)base64, strlen((const char*)base64)) ;
        std::cout<<str<<std::endl;

        free(base64);

        return 0;
}

That throws a glibc error and a core dump, as it should! Without the free(), everything works fine.

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Thank you. The problem is I included a librarie that contain errors. –  Mils Nov 19 '12 at 20:30

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