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I am trying the EF5 CodeFirst and cannot get the simple setup to work ;(

I have two classes Foo and Bar where Bar represent lookup table.

public class Foo
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public virtual Bar Bar { get; set; }

}

public class Bar
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Description { get; set; }
}

public class MyDbContext : DbContext
{
    static MyDbContext()
    {
        Database.SetInitializer<MyDbContext>(null);
    }

    public MyDbContext(): base("testEF"){}

    public DbSet<Foo> Foos { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Bar> Bars { get; set; }
}

Now I have created a static class that serves as DataAccess Layer - in real-world application it will be on different physical tier

public static class DataAccess
{
    public static Bar GetBarById(int id)
    {
        using (var db = new MyDbContext())
        {
            return db.Bars.SingleOrDefault(b => b.Id == id);
        }
    }

    public static Foo InsertFoo(Foo foo)
    {
        using (var db = new MyDbContext())
        {
            db.Foos.Add(foo);

            db.SaveChanges();
        }
        return foo;
    }
}

I am initializing the DB with seed method:

internal sealed class Configuration : DbMigrationsConfiguration<testEF.MyDbContext>
{
    public Configuration()
    {
        AutomaticMigrationsEnabled = false;
    }
    protected override void Seed(testEF.MyDbContext context)
    {
            context.Bars.AddOrUpdate(
                new Bar { Description = "Bar_1" },
                new Bar { Description = "Bar_2" }

                );
    }
}

This creates two records in Bars table. So far so good...

Here is my Main function

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var bar1 = DataAccess.GetBarById(1); 

    var foo = new Foo
    {
        Name = "Foo_1",
        Bar = bar1
    };

    DataAccess.InsertFoo(foo);

}

After the app runes there is a record in the Foos table:

Id       Name    Bar_Id
1        Foo_1   3   

Why Bar_Id is 3? The EF actually inserted new record to Bars table!

Id  Description
1   Bar_1
2   Bar_2
3   Bar_1

What I am doing wrong?

UPDATE: I have found a workaround - to attach Bar property prior to inserting the record:

public static Foo InsertFoo(Foo foo)
{
    using (var db = new MyDbContext())
    {
        db.Bars.Attach(foo.Bar);

        db.Foos.Add(foo);

        db.SaveChanges();
    }
    return foo;
}

It is working now but this is more like a hack than a valid solution... In real-world application the complexity of the objects could become a huge problem. I am open to better solutions

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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem is that bar1 comes from a different data context. Your InsertFoo method implicitly adds it to the second context by building a relationship with the Foo. You want these two to share a context. So use a single context for the whole scope of the Main method.

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+1 for you. i think you are very right.and i think he must setup a foreign key between two table as well. –  Behnam Esmaili Nov 14 '12 at 20:50
    
I cannot have data access code on the client side. Let say my shared DataAccess class is WCF service. I cannot believe the EF is not suitable for large distributed applications. –  Michael D. Nov 14 '12 at 20:59
1  
@MichaelD. Assuming it's a WCF service, what you would want to do is create a context when the request begins and make sure all your WCF methods use that context (usually by storing it in the HttpContext). This is common technique that is employed also by projects like nHibernate. –  CodingGorilla Nov 14 '12 at 21:19
    
Michael, I didn't tell you to have data access code on the client side. –  Craig Stuntz Nov 14 '12 at 22:00
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The complexity you mention (which I agree with you) is caused by using a static class for your data access component. It forces you to separate your DBContext's across method calls. Instead of doing it that way, why not create a normal class, and build the context in the constructor.

With this, you don't need to attach foo.Bar anymore.

public class DataAccess
{
    private MyDbContext _context;

    public DataAccess(){
        _context = new MyDbContext();
    }

    public Bar GetBarById(int id)
    {
        return _context.Bars.SingleOrDefault(b => b.Id == id);
    }

    public Foo InsertFoo(Foo foo)
    {
        _context.Foos.Add(foo);

        _context.SaveChanges();

        return foo;
    }
}

There are many ways you can build on and enhance this. You could create an interface for MyDbContext called IDbContext and using a DI framework inject it into this class. Similarly, you could do the same for the DataAccess class and inject that into wherever it's needed.

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