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My application code is structured as shown below in Rails 3.2. If I go into the Rails console and enter Foo::Bar::FooBar it will return this warning:

warning: toplevel constant FooBar referenced by Foo::Bar::FooBar

Application code and files they are located in:

# app/models/foo/bar/foo_bar.rb
module Foo
  class Bar
    class FooBar
    end
  end
end

# app/models/foo/bar.rb
module Foo
  class Bar
  end
end

# app/models/foo_bar.rb
class FooBar
end

My autoload paths have not been changed from the Rails defaults.

One way I've been able to fix the issue has been to add the following code to Foo::Bar::FooBar. However, it feels dirty and I was wondering if there was a configuration option or some other thing I'm doing wrong that would fix the issue.

# app/models/foo/bar/foo_bar.rb
module Foo
  # This line of code removes the warning and makes class methods execute
  # on the Foo::Bar::FooBar class instead of the FooBar class.
  class Bar; end

  class Bar
    class FooBar
    end
  end
end
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1 Answer 1

The basic problem is that you're reusing the same name for different classes, in an overlapping scope. You might be able to do something clever to make Ruby resolve the constant name in the way you want, but this kind of "solution" is fundamentally brittle. (What if a new version of Ruby makes a tiny change to how constants are looked up, or you move to another Ruby implementation?)

Why don't you just namespace the top-level FooBar model class within a Module? (You'll have to move the file into a subdirectory with the same name as the Module.)

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It should be noted that I have other occasions in the same application that load Foo::Baz and Baz, which never have any problems. Additionally, if I implement this in plain Ruby, there are no problems. It's only when I'm doing this in my Rails application that it becomes a loading issue. –  joshhepworth Nov 15 '12 at 0:32

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