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I have to build a small OpenGL wrapper for a work. I'm trying to avoid writing copy constructors and copy assignment for all my classes.

The one way to be really lazy and never write copy is to use pointers, but since pointers are evil I'm trying to use exclusively std::shared_ptr.

Problem is by using a constructor that receives a std::shared_ptr by value my program crashes, and when using perfect forwarding it only works when I'm passing an lvalue.

// this class doesn't have any default, copy constructors.
class Dep
{
    Dep(std::string path, GLenum type);
};

class Program
{
std::shared_ptr<Dep> dep1;
std::shared_ptr<Dep> dep2;

(...)

I have tried 2 different kinds of constructors:

template <class T, class = typename std::enable_if<std::is_constructible<std::shared_ptr<Dep>, T>::value>::type>
Program(T&& dep1, T&& dep2)
: dep1(std::forward<T>(dep1)), dep2(std::forward<T>(dep2))
{
}

and the other one

Program(std::shared_ptr<Dep> dep1, std::shared_ptr<Dep> dep2)
: dep1(std::move(dep1)), dep2(std::move(dep2))
{
}

What I want to do is being able to pass pass either an lvalue or rvalue shared pointer, but it doesn't work it crashes every time unless I use lvalue on the forward one.

// passing these work on the std::forward one, but that's the only case it works
// if i try to use std::make_shared as parameter (for rvalue) it crashes on both
// the std::move and std::forward ones.
auto vs = std::make_shared<GLShader>("TriangleVS.glsl", GL_VERTEX_SHADER);
auto fs = std::make_shared<GLShader>("TriangleFS.glsl", GL_FRAGMENT_SHADER);

summary: lvalue on the std::forward one works. rvalue on std::forward does not work. lvalue or rvalue on the std::move one dont work. it just hangs the program when the std::shared_ptr constructor is called (inside the Program constructor).

I watched Scott Mayers universal references talk and I thought I was understanding this, and this happens to me.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't see anything wrong with this code, and it tests out OK on http://ideone.com/jlShgB too:

#include <memory>
#include <utility>
#include <string>
#include <cassert>

enum GLenum { foo };

// this class doesn't have any default, copy constructors.
struct Dep
{
    Dep(std::string path, GLenum type) {}
    Dep() = delete;
    Dep(Dep const&) = delete;
};

struct Program
{
    std::shared_ptr<Dep> dep1;
    std::shared_ptr<Dep> dep2;

#if 1
    template <class T, class = typename std::enable_if<std::is_constructible<std::shared_ptr<Dep>, T>::value>::type>
    Program(T&& dep1, T&& dep2)
        : dep1(std::forward<T>(dep1)), dep2(std::forward<T>(dep2))
    {
    }
#else
    Program(std::shared_ptr<Dep> dep1, std::shared_ptr<Dep> dep2)
        : dep1(std::move(dep1)), dep2(std::move(dep2))
    {
    }
#endif
};

int main()
{
    auto dep1 = std::make_shared<Dep>("dep1", foo);
    auto dep2 = std::make_shared<Dep>("dep2", foo);
    Program p(std::move(dep1), std::move(dep2));

    assert(!dep1 && !dep2);
}

Of course if you change #if 1 to #if 0, the assert will raise an exception because the dep1/dep2 will not have been moved from.

This leads me to suspect another issue somewhere else. If you can isolate a SSCCE that exhibits the problem, please let me know.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks so much for the answer. that code is just like mine, in fact i just tried it on my compiler vs2012 and worked great! maybe something to do with the Dep class? maybe its constructor? Dep class is a class that does a lot of initialization work inside its constructor (but it never initializes memory or shared_ptr's) because its a class that has to know what it will work as at initialization time. But i tested it before alone and worked great. Program class is just a small container for 2 Deps so cant be that. ill try to isolate the problem and then ask again here for help. thanks again. –  sap Nov 14 '12 at 21:37
    
ok i figured out the problem, inside the Program class i was accessing one of the parameters members AFTER moving, instead of using the class ones with "this->" (i don't really like using this-> but i will now!). again thanks for the help, accepting your answer because its a good future reference for me for building constructors that accept std::shared_ptr's. once again many thanks. –  sap Nov 14 '12 at 21:49
    
@sap Thanks for the feedback. I hope the idea of 'assert'-ing that might have helped. Also, I usually make it a point to make member names unique, like _dep1(dep1) or _dep1(arg1). –  sehe Nov 14 '12 at 23:13

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